Kumagoro42's picture
By: Kumagoro42, Gianluca Aicardi
Jun 07 2017 10:40pm
5
Login or register to post comments
4739 views


 White is for Angels, black is for Demons... now, what's red and has wings as well? Folklore says that Western Dragons are evil treasure hoarders while Eastern Dragons are benevolent philosophers, and in my home city there's a well-known effigy of Saint George slaying one. So I know what I'm writing about here!

  • Definition: every Dragon card in the game
  • Number of cards: 165 (+54 since the last update)
  • What you need to know: Body is the sum of Power and Toughness; the Rating is calculated on a scale from 0 to 10; the entries are ordered alphabetically. Anthology sets are disregarded except for the Duel Decks and From the Vault series.
  • Click HERE to go directly to the hypertextual list at the end with all of the entries.
  • Click HERE to check all the latest additions.

1. 

  • Name: Acid-Spewer Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Silumgar
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 6
  • Evaluation: Acid-Spewer Dragon happens to be the first Dragon in alphabetical order, despite not being very representative of the tribe. For starters, it comes in a color that's not the more typical red, albeit black is the more frequent among the non-red colors. It's also the only Dragon to have deathtouch (due to that thing it uses to do that gives it its name), except for its very master, Silumgar. Acid-Spewer Dragon is in fact one of the many Dragons of Tarkir (almost one quarter of all existing Dragons in the game currently come from that plane), part of a 5-color cycle that exploits megamorph. Except it doesn't really make a great case for it, since both its megamorph cost and its regular casting cost are horribly overcosted. The price of being an uncommon, I guess.
  • Rating: 3

2. 

  • Name: Akoum Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Battle for Zendikar
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Zendikar is not a plane with that many Dragons (the five Zendikar sets so far only had one each, except for Rise of the Eldrazi that had none), but the few we get are usually decent, if not exactly amazing. Akoum Hellkite is a little thin in the body for a 6-mana creature, but landfall is always a powerful mechanic because it doesn't require you to do anything you wouldn't usually do during your turn, that is playing a land. Plus, you could easily have more than one lands entering the battlefield in the same turn, primarily via fetching. This Hellkite's landfall trigger is particularly welcome because it means you can consistently keep the opponent's 1- or 2-powered creatures off the board, and there are several of them that can be quite annoying to the point of being must-kill. And if there's no target, you can just deal more damage to the opponent's dome, which I guess makes up a little for the reduced power.
  • Rating: 6

3.  

  • Name: Alabaster Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Weatherlight, Portal
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: One of the first things to keep in mind when looking at Dragons is: with a handful of exceptions, they're not going to be cheap, mana-wise. In fact, 6 CMC is pretty much the average cost for them, dating back to the very first member of the tribe, the glorious Shivan Dragon. As such, they all have a pretty clear point of comparison with what has become the modern paradigm for 6-mana creatures: the M11 Titans. So, how does Alabaster Dragon compare to them, or to other Dragons of the same cost? Very badly, I'm afraid. It's just a 4/4 flyer with an ability that looks halfway between pointless and actually counterproductive, because it negates any chance of Resurrection. The only notable thing about him is that he's one of only six mono-white Dragons. Too bad at least a couple of them are good enough to entirely eclipse even this little fact.
  • Rating: 2

4. 

  • Name: Ancient Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Magic 2011
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: A joke I read once on an Internet forum and I particularly liked was about the so-called Obligatory Dragon. The Obligatory Dragon is the Dragon that every set seems to have, because people like Dragons. It's usually a 5/5 mono-red flyer for 6 or 7 mana, and it usually comes with some sort of damage-dealing ability linked to its attack. Ancient Hellkite was the Obligatory Dragon of M11, aka the Land of the Titans. It's a 6/6, so better than grandpa Shivan Dragon, but also costs 7 mana (and it's heavy on the red component), which already makes it worse than Inferno Titan. Its damage ability use the "activate only when attacking" clause from the Obligatory Dragon joke, which is indeed typical of several Dragons, most notably Flameblast Dragon. Where Flameblast would let you cast a Fireball, though, this Hellkite allows for repeatable pinging, which means the former is better against single targets, the latter against armies of weenies. Now, don't get me wrong, if you manage to keep this thing on the battlefield a couple turns, you're probably going to win. But that's something that happens mostly in the realm of casual play. And even there, you'll have better Dragons to hardcast for that much mana, and even better Dragons to reanimate.
  • Rating: 5

5. 

  • Name: Arashin Sovereign   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Dromoka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Once in a while this ability will show up, but even in Magic's modern era, when libraries are reshuffled every other turn, getting the chance to draw your fattie again doesn't seem that relevant, except in extreme situations where your deck is running out of cards. I mean, it's not exactly Eternal Dragon's recursion, let alone a big Eldrazi's graveyard reshuffling shenanigans. I guess it would feel better if this was something you wanted to see again and again, rather than just your regular 7-mana beater.
  • Rating: 4

6. 

  • Name: Arcades Sabboth   >> summary
  • Set: Legends
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 14
  • Evaluation: Ah, the Elder Dragons! Those who would give birth to that amazing format that is Commander! So iconic they are! So utterly, indefensibly awful! I mean, look at this guy. He has a toughness-pumping ability! That uses white mana only! (To balance it, I guess). What use for toughness-pumping could possibly have a creature that already blocks with toughness 9? I know, trying to understand the thought process of the Legends designers is a dangerous proposition. Anyway, the main issues that definitely send the good ole Elder Dragons to the retirement home they deserve are their insane casting cost that includes six colored mana between three different colors and, most importantly, the fact that they keep asking for more mana every upkeep. Back in those times, upkeep costs were an annoying way to give a downside to creatures considered too powerful (thankfully, they would stop using them in later years). But the thing is, Arcades Sabboth is not really that powerful: he's nothing more than a big evasive beater. The tactical value of his +0/+2 to untapped creatures is laughable, and he just dies to anything, including, sadly, Terror, which is hilarious for such a supposedly commanding creature. Granted, there aren't many modern Dragons with natural body 14, but that's not particularly relevant if they can bring to the table something else. And one modern Dragon that does have such a body, Karrthus, is also three-colored (but for half the colored cost), yet drops for 1 mana less, gets haste, has no downsides, and comes with other useful abilities. Sorry, Archie. Time for your meds and your afternoon nap.
  • Rating: 1

7. 

  • Name: Archwing Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Avacyn Restored
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Archwing Dragon is one of several attempts at giving the Dragon tribe something cheaper than 5 mana. By making you pay 4 mana every turn. Heh. It's a trick already performed by the Dragon cousins, the Viashinos, during Visions and Urza's Legacy times. But 4 mana is a lot to ask for. That's why Viashino Sandstalker worked; Viashino Cutthroat, not so much.
  • Rating: 5

8. 

  • Name: Atarka, World Render   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: One of the five Elder Dragons from Tarkir, Atarka is described as the ultimate predator, and she's certainly capable of administering a vicious beating, effectively hitting for 12 trampling damage at every attack, plus extending her lethal bloodthirst to any other Dragons that happens to be on your team. Only by pumping Dragon Tyrant you'd be able to wreak more havoc on your opponent. Only problem is, she doesn't do anything else. She's a big, bad, short clock with no strategic value whatsoever. Still, her clock is really short, and she's part green, so you can cheat her into play with all those effects that care for green creatures, Natural Order first and foremost.
  • Rating: 7

9. 

  • Name: Avaricious Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Magic Origins
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: See, this is the Dragon tribe trying to be strategic. Trying, not entirely succeeding. Although, "now or never" is part of the red's DNA since day 1, and in a fast deck with lots of burn spells, drawing two of them per turn in topdeck mode is key to the victory. So I think Avaricious Dragon is a good midrange addition in that kind of deck. But I also think that kind of deck doesn't usually want to even reach midrange mana. And in any other build, this guy is essentially unplayable.
  • Rating: 6

10. 

  • Name: Balefire Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Innistrad
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Another big group of Dragon abilities is triggered when combat damage is dealt to the opponent (the Invasion and Planar Chaos Dragon cycles are all based on it, for instance). It's one of the hardest requirements for a trigger, because it doesn't only make you wait for a phase that will happen only the turn after the creature has hit the battlefield, it's also dependent on the actual success of an attack. As far as this kind of things goes, though, Balefire Dragon provides one of the strongest payoffs: 6 damage to the entire enemy team isn't negligible, and will result in a one-side board sweeper most of the times. Plus, a flyer is always more likely to connect than most other creatures, and the effect isn't merely a "win more", it might really change the entire course of a game. Still, you have to pull it off, and this is a 7-mana guy we're talking about here. But it's worth the effort more often than not. It sure makes for a scary board presence.
  • Rating: 7

11. 

  • Name: Belltoll Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Ojutai
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 6
  • Evaluation: So all the members of the five lackeys cycle from Dragons of Tarkir are exactly the same: same cost, same body, same megamorph trigger; what changes is only the color and one of the keyword abilities. Hexproof is almost always better than, say, deathtouch, but it's not enough to significantly alter my overall judgment on these guys.
  • Rating: 3

12.  

  • Name: Bladewing the Risen   >> summary
  • Sets: Scourge, Commander, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Zombie
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: This Karmic Guide for Dragons is a very solid member of the tribe and an excellent commander, arguably the best along with Karrthus and the Scion for any Dragon-based deck, in virtue of him directly referencing the Dragon type in his ability. Which makes it essentially two Dragons at the price of one, provided you properly set up the graveyard with some kind of Entomb effect. The shared firebreathing is a decent bonus ability, too. The only less-than-amazing element is his body, that's fairly meager for 7 mana. Well, considering that he's actually supposed to be Rorix that came back from the grave (indeed, the Zombie type was added later), some feebleness is understandable.
  • Rating: 7

13.  

  • Name: Bogardan Hellkite   >> summary
  • Sets: Time Spiral, Magic 2010, Commander 2014, Duel Decks: Knights vs. Dragons, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: One of the best things a high-costing creature can do is to provide a board-impacting ETB effect. Bogardan Hellkite has famously one of the most effective of those, which turned it into an instant star of reanimator builds (I used it for some time myself in an old RecSur list, with great satisfaction) and various other shenanigan decks like, most notably, Dragonstorm. It's very straightforward: a creature that doubles as a sorcery that deals 5 damage to the opponent's dome, or alternatively, to a chosen selection of their best creatures. The devastation brought by a resolved Bogardan Hellkite is hard to beat, and you know it only asks to be abused somehow, between recursion or blinking effects. On top of that, oh look, he's also a 5/5 evasive finisher! The 8 mana of his hard cost are rarely even paid in the kind of decks that look at him as the last piece of their combo strategy, but in case you do, it comes with flash to make things better and maybe catch some other creature by surprise (I tried it with some degree of success in a Modern Big Red deck fueled by Braid of Fire). Bogardan Hellkite is really the fiery gift that keeps on giving fiery punishment.
  • Rating: 9

14. 

  • Name: Boltwing Marauder   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Kolaghan
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: You know, this guy is one of the more obscure rares from Dragons of Tarkir, but it's not that bad. A 5/4 for 5 is an okay finisher, and the power boost for each creature entering the game, the way it's worded, can lead to some interesting hijinks. Just think of the effect of multiple creatures entering at once, like with Lingering Souls. Or, to remain in color, think of how Goblin Assault now creates 3/1 tokens. Fun, in the more aggressive sense of the word.
  • Rating: 6

15. 

16. 

  • Name: Broodmate Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Shards of Alara, Modern Masters 2017
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 16 (two bodies of 8)
  • Evaluation: Broodmate Dragon passes the Titan Test: your six mana are put to good, safe use if you invest them into not just one, but two flyers. In average, at least one of them will survive to attack. And you know, it's an ETB effect. Every time I see an ETB effect, the Johnny in me automatically thinks of ways to abuse it. But it's good even if you don't. On the flavor side, I always thought these were a dragon and its mate, in the "mating season" sense, you know: a breeding mate; boyfriend dragon and girlfriend dragon. But it's been recently brought to my attention that they're more likely supposed to be "mates" from the same brood. Siblings, that is. In any case, just try and keep them together, or you'll break their hearts.
  • Rating: 8

17. 

  • Name: Canopy Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Mirage
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: How does this work? It's a Dragon without wings that sometimes decides to jump? I don't even wanna know, we've entered pre-Modern green territory, which means terrible, terrible creatures.
  • Rating: 2

18. 

  • Name: Catacomb Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Mirage
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: I hope there was some kind of flavor reason in the Mirage back story for this Dragon to have such an overcomplicated, clause-filled ability. Or maybe those were just the times before the New World Order. What all that text says is that this thing is hard to kill by blocking. Okay. You almost convinced me to spend my Titan mana on you, Catacomb Dragon. Almost, just not quite.
  • Rating: 4

19. 

  • Name: Chromium   >> summary
  • Set: Legends
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 14
  • Evaluation: According to Magic lore, Chromium's last name is actually "Rhuell". That's all I'm comfortable saying about a Dragon who's supposedly part of a group of God-like beings but whose main distinctive ability is freaking rampage. There might be a reason if they didn't even bother to put his full name on the card.
  • Rating: 0

20. 

  • Name: Clockwork Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Mirrodin
  • Additional Type: Artifact 
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Someone at WotC really likes the "clockwork" mechanic, because they keep trying to print creatures that uses it, despite not making a lot of sense: losing counters each time the creature does something is a terrible hindrance that never gets an adequate counterweight. This Dragon, for instance, as a 6/6 for 7 mana isn't a particularly good deal to begin with, and it only gets worse when it's actually on the battlefield. Anyway, this is one of eight mechanical dragons, a concept that's interesting in itself but has only rarely produced significant outcomes.
  • Rating: 2

21. 

  • Name: Cloud Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Portal
  • Additional Type: Illusion 
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: There are five mono-blue Dragons. This one from Portal, that somehow manages to be a worse Air Elemental, isn't going to be the most memorable of the bunch.
  • Rating: 2

22. 

  • Name: Covetous Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Urza's Destiny
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 11
  • Evaluation: I don't think I ever saw this guy played much, but it's actually a strong, cheap beater (6 power for 5 mana) in a deck that features artifact lands. If it were Modern legal, I'm sure somebody would try it in some kind of equipment build. It's also eminently splashable. All in all, surprisingly strong, and surprisingly an actual "artifacts matter" card from Urza block. There's some good flavor, too: this hoarder dragon dies (of... heartbreak?) when it loses its last piece of treasure.
  • Rating: 7

23.  

  • Name: Crimson Hellkite   >> summary
  • Sets: Mirage, Sixth Edition, Seventh Edition
  • Converted Mana Cost: 9
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Hey, that ability is kinda strong. I mean, it's a Fireball per turn. Except it strictly requires red mana. And tapping. And doesn't target players. And this thing costs 9 mana to begin with. Clunker, thy name is Crimson Hellkite.
  • Rating: 5

24.  

  • Name: Crosis, the Purger   >> summary
  • Sets: Invasion, Premium Deck Series: Graveborn
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: The Invasion cycle of Legendary Dragons depicts the Primeval Dragons, ancient Dragon-Gods from Dominaria that reawakened during the Phyrexian Invasion. Their names in Draconic language supposedly represent the five stages of a Dragon's life: Rhammidarigaaz is "conception", Rith is "childhood", Treva is "youth", Dromar is "adulthood", and Crosis here is "death" (interestingly, the colors associated with these concepts, that make for the central color in their triplets, are, respectively, red, green, white, blue and black, which means the color wheel also describes the stages of life. Cool, uh?). And they all have Attendant Golems (Crosis' one is Iron Man, apparently), whose flavor text clearly states which part of the Ur-Dragon they like the most. This is all nice and good, but at the end of the day, what we have here is a cycle of three-colored 6/6 flyers for 6, which is pretty decent, with a different color-coded ability that gets activated by spending 3 mana (one of which of their main color) once the Dragon connects with the opponent. In the case of black-based Crosis, the ability is a mass discard focused on a chosen color. It's not bad but it's more situational than most of his brothers and sisters. And as a Grixis generic commander, Crosis faces the competition of better options like, for instance, Thraximundar. All in all, not the most impressive of the cycle, but still a playable finisher in the right deck.
  • Rating: 6

25. 

  • Name: Cunning Breezedancer   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Ojutai
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Cunning Breezedancer is sort of the opposite of Boltwing Marauder (the way Ojutai is sort of the opposite of Kolaghan). The latter would care about creatures entering the battlefield, this one is all about non-creature spells. But it's also smaller, more expensive, and has himself as the mandatory target for the trigger, which may be its worst flaw, turning the whole affair into an oversized prowess.
  • Rating: 4

26. 

  • Name: Darigaaz, the Igniter   >> summary
  • Sets: Invasion, Duel Decks: Phyrexia vs. the Coalition
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Rhammidarigaaz, which for some reason gets abbreviated into "Darigaaz" (I would call him "Rhammy" myself), is the first of the Primeval Dragons, son of Urza's dragon lady friend Gherridarigaaz (yeah, all these dragons have ridiculous names), and the one who got convinced by Karn to be a good boy and stop waging war to both Phyrexians and Dominarians. As a card, his ability is pretty similar to Crosis's, except somehow even worse, since it's still based on whatever the opponent happens to have in hand that belongs to one color, but instead of getting rid of those cards, Darigaaz just does a few damage to that player, which rarely will be more than 2 or 3. Pretty underwhelming.
  • Rating: 5

27. 

28. 

  • Name: Destructor Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Affiliation: Atarka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Fate Reforged had an uncommon monocolored cycle too. They are all 4/4 flyers for 6 mana, which is not good. Then they get a different ability, either a death trigger or an attack trigger. This one kills noncreature stuff, as it's green's wont. I don't think it would've been overpowered if it just killed an artifact or enchantment as an ETB trigger, but maybe that's just me.
  • Rating: 3

29. 

  • Name: Draco   >> summary
  • Sets: Planeshift, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Additional Type: Artifact
  • Converted Mana Cost: 16
  • Body: 18
  • Evaluation: Draco is famous (or notorious) for still being the card with the highest converted mana cost printed on it, one mana more than the original Emrakul and Autochthon Wurm. As such, over the course of the years, Draco has been the go-to card for those combos that care about CMC, the most popular being Erratic Explosion. Once Emrakul was printed, though, he kinda replaced old Draco in that kind of situation, given the additional advantage Emrakul provides when discarded to the graveyard. As for using Draco "the honest way", that's more or less feasible, especially with something like Prismatic Omen, that makes it cost 6 and cancels the upkeep cost entirely. A 9/9 flyer probably needs to only score 2 attacks to seal the deal, but it's still a far less attractive combo than just hurling a mecha-dragon at people's faces.
  • Rating: 6

30. 

  • Name: Dragon Broodmother   >> summary
  • Set: Alara Reborn
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: What I like the most about this card is that the latest baby dragon tend to eat its older siblings in order to grow bigger. Very true to life. The mother's body is unimpressive for 6 mana, but if her baby-making engine keeps going, all those tiny (or not-so-tiny) hungry offspring will take over the board eventually. Fun card.
  • Rating: 6

31. 

  • Name: Dragon Egg   >> summary
  • Sets: Magic 2014, Eternal Masters
  • Converted Mana Cost: 3
  • Body: 2 (4 after transformation)
  • Evaluation: M14 was the time when Magic R&D found out that they did a Rukh Egg, they did a Roc Egg, they even did an absurdist Dingus Egg, yet they had never brought into the game what's arguably the most iconic egg in fantasy stories. Roc Egg remains the main comparison here, since it has the same cost. Dragon Egg has a lower toughness (for some reason), but that doesn't really matter because you actually want for it to die asap. Then the resulting Bird from Roc Egg is a 3/3, whereas our newborn Dragon is a 2/2 with firebreathing, which is flavorful enough but I personally like the 3/3 better. In a Dragon tribal deck, the egg could work as an early presence, but the wiser choice could be to try and ramp into larger Dragons instead. All in all, this feels more like something that came to be because it was overdue as opposed to an actual design space being explored.
  • Rating: 5

32. 

  • Name: Dragon Hatchling   >> summary
  • Sets: Magic 2013, Magic 2014
  • Converted Mana Cost: 2
  • Body: 1
  • Evaluation: The smallest of all the Dragons is the follow-up to a concept, the baby dragon, that's been around since when Alpha first introduced us to Dragon Whelp. This cheaper version certainly guarantees a very early presence in a Dragon tribal deck, although that tiny toughness doesn't really help stopping attacks, and firebreathing is cute but you aren't really going to keep mana open for him early on, when you have to cast his bigger brothers, or just anything else. This said, Dragon Hatchling owns the record of being the first common Dragon ever printed, and still one of only three in existence (Dragon Egg was reprinted as common in Eternal Masters, and then Lightning Shrieker was released in Fate Reforged).
  • Rating: 4

33. 

  • Name: Dragon Mage   >> summary
  • Sets: Scourge, Commander 2015, Commander 2016
  • Additional Type: Wizard
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: A mandatory Wheel of Fortune at each successful attack. Is it useful? Is it fierce? Well, it is kind of fierce, but it would be way more useful if it wasn't linked to combat damage, mostly because that makes it really slow to happen the first time. And for 7 mana, you might want something more than a 5/5 that could, maybe, eventually, cast Wheel of Fortune. And what kind of deck wants a Wheel of Fortune at every attack, anyway? If anything, it sounds like the kind of deck that doesn't have time for a 7-mana creature. Unless you Entomb and Exhume it, then start to dredge your library while also damaging and disrupting the opponent. Sort of a convoluted plan, but to each his own. It's fun in Commander, though, which is the reason why it's been reprinted twice in Commander products.
  • Rating: 5

34. 

  • Name: Dragon Tyrant   >> summary
  • Set: Scourge
  • Converted Mana Cost: 10
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Dragon Tyrant doesn't fool around. A 6/6 double striker with trample and firebreathing is REALLY frightening to face. It could very easily spell good game after a single attack. Problem is: 10 mana are a lot. Okay, let's reanimate this bad boy, then. Wait, it requires FOUR red mana each upkeep?! That seriously gets in the way of that firebreathing, doesn't it? All problems aside, Dragon Tyrant remains one of the draconic heaviest hitters, and cheating it into play with Sneak Attack or Scion of the Ur-Dragon is just a joy. A dark, grinning joy.
  • Rating: 7

35. 

  • Name: Dragon Whelp   >> summary
  • Sets: From Alpha to Fourth Edition, Magic 2010, Time Spiral "Timeshifted", Commander, Duel Decks: Knights vs. Dragons, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 5
  • Evaluation: The Shivan Dragon companion from Alpha, so probably the very first Dragon the original Magic players met, was this cute little youngster freshly hatched from its egg. Curiously, the Whelp is more resilient than what comes out of Dragon Egg, yet not enough fire-resistant to be allowed to breath fire too much. Still, it's a 4-mana flyer that swings for 5. Coupled with its historical value, it's enough to warrant a place among its mightier brethren.
  • Rating: 6

36. 

  • Name: Dragonlord Atarka   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 16
  • Evaluation: If the younger Atarka from Fate Reforged was already a scary beater, if devoid of any true strategic value, her Elder version from the Sarkhan-altered future is in another league entirely, impacting the board right away as sort of an improved Bogardan Hellkite. The only thing she lacks in comparison is the ability to hit the opponent, which means you don't want to replace Bogardan Hellkite in a Dragonstorm build just yet (then again, she's also Legendary, so she wouldn't fit to begin with). For the rest, she's larger; in fact she's one of the largest Dragons ever printed, and if she hits for less than her FRF counterpart, she's also sturdier, and being a 8-powered evasive trampler, she still guarantees a hell of a clock. And she handles planeswalkers, too. But what's probably her major selling point is her being green-colored, which means Natural Order has found a new friend, becoming creature removal of sort in a Natural Order toolbox and/or in ramp build like Elves, that can also easily hardcast her.
  • Rating: 10

37. 

  • Name: Dragonlord Dromoka   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: With universal counterspell hate and lifelink, Dromoka is a DTK Elder focused on defense, as reflected by her big butt (and her more benevolent demeanor). Not at the same power level of her sister Atarka (or, you know, a Titan), because she doesn't immediately impact the board nor she can stop removal once she's landed on the battlefield, but she can similarly be fetched with green-fetching spells and is an imposing presence on the battlefield for a reasonable price. After all, lifelink on a 5-powered flyer made the fortune of a certain Angel.
  • Rating: 8

38. 

  • Name: Dragonlord Kolaghan   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 11
  • Evaluation: As a Dragon with haste, old dame Kolaghan has 16 other fellow tribesmembers to measure herself against (but, interestingly, not her younger self, since dash is very much a different beast). How does she compare? Pretty well, I'd say. Although, coming at 6 mana, she's not really able to outperform the likes of Thundermaw Hellkite or Stormbreath Dragon, she still thoroughly defeats the competition at her spot in the curve and later, and more directly Rorix Bladewing, with whom she shares an identical power/toughness/cost ratio, but a larger set of abilities. Granted, Rorix is monocolored while Kolaghan is a Rakdos creature, but then Rorix actually requires one colored mana more. And universal haste is not something you can easily dismiss. Plus, her final ability is bizarre yet amusing, essentially preventing the opponent from playing another copy of a creature or planeswalker they previously lost (or sacrificed). (Well, they can play them in a pinch, but they'll prefer not to, and it could be annoying). Another solid entry in the Dragonlord cycle.
  • Rating: 8

39. 

  • Name: Dragonlord Ojutai   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: Ojutai is the least mana-intensive of all the Dragonlords. His design is clever, but also slightly disappointing: in order to activate the Anticipate (which, don't get me wrong, is probably the strongest ability being featured in this cycle), he has to give up his hexproof protection. Well, unless you'll find a way to give him vigilance, that is. The thing is, leaving him behind doesn't do much, not just because you're wasting such a powerful trigger, but also because his butt is not large enough to stop any major threat. And if you try and attack with him, he'll just turn into removal magnet. To attack, or not to attack? That is Ojutai's dilemma.
  • Rating: 8

40. 

  • Name: Dragonlord Silumgar   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Somebody had to be at the bottom of the Dragonlord totem pole, and that guy appears to be Silumgar. His casting cost is too high compared to his offensive capability, and deathtouch is mostly irrelevant. This said, his Sower of Temptation-like ability is pretty dope, and the fact that it affects planeswalkers as well is probably the only reason you might want to play with Silumgar to begin with (as opposed to, you know, just stick with Sower of Temptation).
  • Rating: 7

41. 

  • Name: Dream Pillager   >> summary
  • Set: Commander 2015 (online in Legendary Cube Prize Packs)
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: I can see how this could lead to insane outcomes in Commander (for which, after all, it was designed), where you could easily have the resources to cast the 4 (or more) exiled cards, especially in late game. In a 60-card format, it may seem a risky proposition, and its casting cost is too high to be easily manageable anyway.
  • Rating: 6

42. 

43. 

  • Name: Dromoka, the Eternal   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: I feel like the more apt comparison to Dromoka is not another Dragon, but the original Sigarda. They both have a similar casting cost in the same colors, an identical body, and possibly the same role of strong midrange finisher. Of course, bolster is not the same as hexproof (plus universal protection from induced sacrifice), and in turn is also not the same as Archangel of Thune's wild team-boost, so poor Dromoka will never find a spot in the kind of deck she wanted to be a part of. But she's still pretty good, especially in more green-based lists, where she's more easily splashable.
  • Rating: 7

44. 

  • Name: Ebon Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Portal, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: Wow, this Dragon does exactly what Ravenous Rats do, except for 5 mana more! Excess mana that, alone, could pay for a better flyer than this. Good job, Portal, as usual. And good job at reprinting it in From the Vault: Dragons. It really deserved to be immortalized among the best of them.
  • Rating: 2

45. 

  • Name: Elder Land Wurm   >> summary
  • Sets: Legends, 4th Edition
  • Additional Type: Wurm
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Why is this sleeping Wurm even a Dragon? And why does it cost 7 mana? Of which THREE white? And why is it even white to begin with? It's so very clearly a green creature. So many questions, one only answer: Legends. "Sometimes it's best to let the sleeping dragons lie", says the flavor text. I agree. These kinds of dragons should be left sleeping somewhere far, far away from any Magic deck.
  • Rating: 1

46. 

  • Name: Enduring Scalelord   >> summary
  • Sets: Dragons of Tarkir, Commander 2016
  • Affiliation: Dromoka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: So Enduring Scalelord feeds on its team's "+1/+1 counters matter" mechanics. So very Selesnya. Unfortunately, you won't want to invest 6 mana for a 4/4 that has to wait for other things to happen to grow slightly bigger.
  • Rating: 4

47.  

  • Name: Eternal Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Scourge, Commander 2013, Vintage Masters
  • Additional Type: Spirit
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Nowadays, Eternal Dragon is not the powerhouse it used to be, back when it was the darling of every control deck (especially the Astral Slide/Life from the Loam engine from old Extended), but it's still got a pretty impressive recursion going. Supported by an adequate control strategy, that makes possible to say go, return it in hand in the opponent's end phase, then plainscycle it again and again until you have enough mana to cast and protect it (and then recast it ad infinitum, barring exile). It's really a soft lock for the ages. 7 mana for a 5/5 aren't usually that good, evasion or not, but the whole trick it pulls makes them bearable.
  • Rating: 8

48. 

  • Name: Exalted Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Exodus
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Oh, an Exalted Dragon! It's gotta be a bigger, nastier Exalted Angel, right? Uhm... no, actually, it's just a stupid white Dragon that kills your own lands. This should be more correctly called "Disappointing Dragon" ("Pointless Dragon" would also do).
  • Rating: 0

49. 

  • Name: Fire Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Portal
  • Converted Mana Cost: 9
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: "Fire Dragon"? Seriously? That's the best name they could come up with? Ah, Portal, what you gonna do. The ability would actually be pretty good if it didn't cost 9 mana and didn't work only by hardcasting it. UPDATE: The current Oracle text actually clarifies that the trigger happens every time the Fire Dragon enters the battlefield, even from zones that aren't your hand. Well, it's still bad. It would be slightly less bad, and almost worth some recursion shenanigans, if it could at least hit the opponent. Also, the release of Journey into Nyx's Spawn of Thraxes simply made it entirely obsolete.
  • Rating: 3

50. 

  • Name: Firestorm Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Visions
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: There have been a few Izzet-colored Dragons in the game, even before Izzet star Niv-Mizzet came to be. Not that trample feels like much of an Izzet ability, to be honest, although it's welcome and body 12 for 6 mana is more than adequate. That cumulative upkeep, though. Ugh. Way to ruin a party.
  • Rating: 4

51. 

  • Name: Flameblast Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Shards of Alara, Magic 2012
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Look, Flameblast Dragon really looks like a casual card. But, you know, it's a strong casual card. It's a Shivan Dragon that has firebreathing replaced with a freaking Fireball. In fact, I'd say that it's a strictly better Shivan Dragon (you lose 1 damage if all you wanted to do was to scorch the opponent, but the accompanying tactical value is just a whole other level). This has to count for something. If you catch a competitive deck by surprise with this, it's game over very fast, and that's the Inevitability Rule of Fatties. Along with Steel Hellkite, Flameblast Dragon is definitely one of the most underrated Dragons.
  • Rating: 8

52. 

  • Name: Fledgling Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Judgment
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 4
  • Evaluation: Another one in the Dragon Whelp category, this one becomes a fully-fledged (it was fledgling, indeed!) Shivan Dragon by virtue of the threshold mechanic. Thing is, it's probably easier to ramp into another 2 mana and directly cast Shivan Dragon (or something better), than to try and achieve threshold, unless that's already a goal of the deck for some reason, in which case, suit yourself; but if things go south, keep in mind that a 2/2 for 4 isn't really that great.
  • Rating: 5

53. 

  • Name: Foe-Razer Regent   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Atarka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: Green removal via fight is good and all, but I wish Foe-Razer Regent was something like a 3/3 for 5, instead. 7 mana are just too many for a single removal effect, even if it might be arguably a fair cost, considering it's essentially a 6/7, as long as you handle the fight correctly. It could be fun in a deck with a lot of instances of fight.
  • Rating: 6

54.  

  • Name: Forgestoker Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Born of the Gods
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: This guy is yet another Dragon that has to attack in order to do something. The golden paragon here is Flameblast Dragon, which is a more efficient source of removal (and, more importantly, can damage the opponent), while Shivan Hellkite doesn't even need to attack to ping creatures the same way. The key is the ability to prevent blocking, of course, and that's tactically useful, even if there can't be too many situations in which you're attacking for 5 in the air and still need to worry about blockers. I mean, a 6-mana flyer can't have the same role as a 1-mana Goblin.
  • Rating: 6

55. 

  • Name: Freejam Regent   >> summary
  • Set: Aether Revolt
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: This could cost as little as 2 red mana in the proper deck. Which could mean a very, very early turn in a true affinity build (improvise is sort of a weaker affinity, after all). But then, would such a deck even care about having this Dragon on the battlefield? It certainly wouldn't care for the firebreathing.
  • Rating: 5

56. 

  • Name: Furnace Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Darksteel
  • Converted Mana Cost: 9
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Furnace Dragon was a good finisher in affinity decks from the first Mirrodin era, coming cheap and essentially sweeping away everything else. Pretty much no other deck would have any use for it. More so, within a meta that doesn't rely on artifacts as heavily as that old block did, Furnace Dragon would just end up damaging its own side exclusively or the most. And actually, old affinity decks stopped caring about it and its over-commitment to red at some point, and the same goes for contemporary affinity builds in Legacy. But it's an old glory, and needs to be at least acknowledged as that.
  • Rating: 6

57. 

  • Name: Furnace Whelp   >> summary
  • Sets: Fifth Dawn, Tenth Edition, Magic 2013, Magic 2015, Commander, Duel Decks: Jace vs. Chandra
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 4
  • Evaluation: Does the 3-mana-only clause on Dragon Whelp annoy you? Would you rather it lost a point of toughness than to have to deal with that clause? Done. Is it that different? No, it's pretty much the same. How often would you need to dump more than RRR into a Dragon Whelp, anyway? And if you're thinking of going all in with your firebreathing alpha strike, Dragon Whelp does also allow for it, thank you very much. In fact, not being able to survive blocking any 2-powered guy makes Furnace Whelp slightly worse.
  • Rating: 5

58. 

  • Name: Furyborn Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Magic 2012
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Magic 2012's Obligatory Dragon. In that core set there was bloodthirst as a returning mechanic, so this one gets bloodthirst. Which means it'll often turn up as a 12/12 flyer for 7 mana, inevitability ensues. Good, not great.
  • Rating: 6

59. 

  • Name: Glorybringer   >> summary
  • Set: Amonkhet
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Amonkhet might just have given us the third member of the royal family of 5-mana hasty Dragons after the often-mentioned Thundermaw Hellkite and Stormbreath Dragon. It's less hard-hitting than both, considering Stormbreath Dragon is able to grow to 7/7 proportions. What Glorybringer... uh... brings (aside from glory) is the removal factor. A big, unforgiving removal that obliterates even enemies that thought they were safe because they were Lightning Bolt-proof. Ah! Glorybringer doesn't throw mere Lightning Bolts! (More appropriately, it throws Flame Slashes, it seems). There's the issue of having to stop for a full turn to recover from exerting, but other than the fact that there are ways around that, it's still a worthy price to pay for free, repeatable removal.
  • Rating: 9

60. 

  • Name: Harbinger of the Hunt   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Atarka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Harbinger of the Hunt does some things well and some things badly. The good: it's both Earthquake and Hurricane on legs (separately, not at the same time); and it doesn't kill itself via Hurricane (which would be absurd, since what it does is not an actual hurricane). The bad: it's all very mana-intensive; sometimes you just want to kill that Vendilion Clique and that Dark Confidant you're facing, and that would cost 6 mana; and its toughness is terrible, so if it's 9-mana Hurricane for 3 won't kill it, a 1-mana Lightning Bolt will. Very likely before you even hit 9 mana.
  • Rating: 5

61. 

  • Name: Hellkite Charger   >> summary
  • Sets: Zendikar, Modern Masters 2015
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: A hasty Shivan Dragon is certainly more than decent already. Its take on the "Dragon attacks matter" ability seems mostly conceived for over-the-top formats like Commander, but if you manage to pull it off, it easily turns into a lethal one-shot. This is another kind of underrated Dragon, given that for Titan mana it does impact the board from the get-go (well, not with its ability, of course, just by swinging for 5). Unfortunately, the later appearance of the 5-mana wonder kids from the Thundermaw Hellkite generation didn't help Hellkite Charger's reputation.
  • Rating: 7

62. 

  • Name: Hellkite Hatchling   >> summary
  • Sets: Conflux, Planechase 2012
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 4
  • Evaluation: Devour is a weird ability in that it can alternatively be a hoot or a total waste of space. Building the deck right is only half the trick; if you topdeck a devour creature on an empty board, you invariably end up with something that costs more than it's due. And considering the implicit X-for-1 nature of devour, going all in can be a real hazard. It usually works better when it's backed up by a definite combo plan, like with Predator Dragon in Elfball builds. This cute Hatchling grows too slowly, though, and lacks haste, which is what you get for costing only 4 mana, as much as they might still be too many.
  • Rating: 5

63. 

  • Name: Hellkite Igniter   >> summary
  • Sets: Mirrodin Besieged, Commander 2016
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: I remember Hellkite Igniter being sort of almost played during SOM block, since there were enough artifacts around it to make it a "drop & kill" card (or at least "drop, inflict 5 damage, kill next turn"). Such situational firebreathing variant can be set up easily enough, given that in order to hit 7 mana fast you might want to put some mana rocks in there, and those in turn will make the Igniter hit harder. It's still kind of too specific to be overall good, and if you want a big hasty Dragon with a flashy ability you'll be better off with something in the Titan-mana range like Hellkite Charger.
  • Rating: 5

64. 

  • Name: Hellkite Overlord   >> summary
  • Sets: Shards of Alara, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 16
  • Evaluation: Forget about the big, super-colored mana cost. This is a great reanimation and Natural Order target. Well, a viable reanimation and Natural Order target, at least. You can go safer, since the Overlord is not hexproof, for one (although its big butt and regeneration help). But if you're looking for a big punch, that's one of the biggest you'll find: 8 instant trampling damage in the sky, plus firebreathing if you feel like it.
  • Rating: 8

65. 

  • Name: Hellkite Tyrant   >> summary
  • Sets: Gatecrash, Commander 2016
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 11
  • Evaluation: After it was spoiled, this one immediately felt weird: Scars of Mirrodin was the artifact set, while Return to Ravnica didn't feature much of them, so why was this Dragon coming up now? It seems like it arrived one year too late. I don't remember if Mark Rosewater ever talked about it (but he probably did, since he talks about everything). Maybe they felt like SOM would have been too powerful a home for it? Or too obvious? In any case, this is another Titan-range Dragon with decent body and an interesting stealing ability (there's no guarantee there will be actual targets for it in any given game, but there's a definite chance, and the stolen goods don't go back to their owners when the Dragon dies), plus a curious, for-hardcore-Johnnies-only, you-win-the-game clause. But you know what, there's just so many 6-mana Dragons at this point, and all things considered, Hellkite Tyrant is not very likely to make the cut, like, anywhere.
  • Rating: 6

66. 

  • Name: Henge Guardian   >> summary
  • Sets: Mercadian Masques, Duel Decks: Knights vs. Dragons
  • Additional Types: Artifact, Wurm
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 7
  • Evaluation: Wow, that's some really forgettable artifact Dragon. It doesn't even fly. It needs to pay for trample (I don't even know what that would mean, is there a "trample button" to press so that it'll start trampling over enemies rather than just gently fighting them?). In fact, I don't think this was ever supposed to be a Dragon. It's called a Wurm in the flavor text. So why during the Grand Creature Type Update was it given the Dragon type, too? Beats me.
  • Rating: 1 (as a Dragon; probably 3 as a Wurm, just for the cost)

67. 

  • Name: Herdchaser Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Atarka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 6
  • Evaluation: This underwhelming cycle is what happens when you try to oversell a concept. Dragons of Tarkir required lots and lots of Dragons (and certainly delivered on that front), they wanted them to show up at each rarity level, in order to make their presence felt in Limited, too. And they had to be full-fledged Dragons, not feeble younglings, so the result was an uncommon cycle of poor full-fledged Dragons.
  • Rating: 3

68. 

  • Name: Hoarding Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Magic 2011, Magic 2015
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: I like Hoarding Dragon more than most. It fetches stuff. It just costs 5 mana. Its body isn't amazing, but then again, it's not a large mana investment. And you get something close to a free Idyllic Tutor. I like it. I don't think that I would ever find room for it in any actual deck, even a combo one (it's a bit too slow for that, and would end up doing things like being fetched by a Birthing Pod to fetch another Birthing Pod, which isn't absolutely a bad trick, but it's not a reason for inclusion per se). Yet, on paper, it's pretty good.
  • Rating: 7

69. 

  • Name: Hoard-Smelter Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Scars of Mirrodin, Commander 2014
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: More than Hellkite Igniter, this was "the" SOM block Dragon, capable of destroying crucial stuff while also getting bigger. And it's more nicely positioned at the 6-mana point of the curve, where all the honest Dragons should be. Could it be any good in absolute? Well, just like in the case of Hellkite Tyrant, it has a good chance to find valid targets for its abilities, although it's not a certainty. So it still feels situational enough to be a (bad) sideboard card at best, or maybe something you'll include in a Commander deck if you'll find room for it.
  • Rating: 6

70. 

  • Name: Hunted Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Ravnica: City of Guilds, Commander 2015
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: The Hunted cycle from Ravnica is more about flavor than anything else (though it's great at that), but there are ways to exploit these creatures wisely. One is, for instance, to play them in multiplayer, where the opponent that gets the "hunters" doesn't need to be your most direct adversary. The Dragon member of the cycle is particularly good because it's a big hasty guy for 5 mana, and the Knights can only react by counter-attacking you (and stopping some 2/2s on the ground is easier than stopping a 6/6 in the sky), but they can't block the Dragon itself – which is something that doesn't happen with most of the other creatures in the cycle: for instance, the Troll and the Horror are designed so to be blocked by their own hunters. Of course, these days you can just play a slightly smaller but more effective 5-mana hasty Dragon with no downsides at all. Or two. But we can't reduce all these evaluations to "Whatever, just play Thundermaw Hellkite or Stormbreath Dragon instead", now, can we?
  • Rating: 6

71. 

  • Name: Hypersonic Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Return to Ravnica
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: And here's yet another 5-mana Dragon with haste and a nice secondary ability, especially for Izzet decks. It's the kind of thing that one can play without feeling too casual. Well, maybe just a little bit.
  • Rating: 6

72. 

  • Name: Icefall Regent   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Ojutai
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 7
  • Evaluation: So Icefall Regent is a wannabe miniature Frost Titan (actually, the Claustrophobia ability is lifted direct from Dungeon Geists). It costs less, and of course being a Dragon it's evasive, but the body just can't compare and is definitely underwhelming, if partially balanced by Frost Titan's protective ability that makes it harder to target. On the whole, a pretty decent midrange control creature.
  • Rating: 6

73. 

  • Name: Imperial Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Legions
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: So, essentially, you play this thing (which is yet another high-costing 6/6 flyer) for 1 mana more (not counting the morphed form), and you'll get to do a "Draconic Tutor". It's good, I guess, as all tutoring always is, plus you could just Flicker it somehow, rather than actually paying its morph cost. And then you'll fetch another one, of course. Astral Slide approves. Outside of such shenanigans, though, it's not very playable.
  • Rating: 6

74. 

  • Name: Intet, the Dreamer   >> summary
  • Sets: Planar Chaos, Commander
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: In typical Planar Chaos fashion, Planar Chaos features alternate reality versions of the Primeval Dragons. They're all wedge-based now (meaning one color and its two opposites in the wheel, rather than one color and its two neighbors), and I can't really tell which is which, even if I assume that, for instance, this wedge-blue Intet is supposed to fill in for the Esperian Dromar. The rest of the stats and mechanics remain the same, except for the triggered effect: in this case, we get to play the topdeck for free (well, except for the activation mana you just spent), which can turn into a pretty strong card and tempo advantage, especially using some library manipulations.
  • Rating: 7

75. 

  • Name: Jugan, the Rising Star   >> summary
  • Sets: Champions of Kamigawa, Modern Masters
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Spirit 
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Jugan is further proof of the "green can't have nice things" rule, which applies (or, to be fair, used to apply) to most of the 5-color cycles where green usually takes the short straw because other colors can get evasive or destructive, but when you tap into green's usual bag of tricks, you'll bound to find underwhelming stuff by comparison. Take this Kamigawa cycle of Dragon Spirits, which elsewhere features death triggers that either steal creatures or just go and take over the board. Instead, green gets this guy who might give some counters to another creature, if such a creature is even there. Yeah, not really the same sport. It gets points for being the elusive green flyer, though.
  • Rating: 5

76. 

  • Name: Karrthus, Tyrant of Jund   >> summary
  • Set: Alara Reborn
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 14
  • Evaluation: Karrthus is a mighty, mighty Dragon and a credit to his race. He's particularly renowned for being a key piece in Dragonstorm's builds, because the moment you've dropped 2 or 3 Bogardan Hellkites, you really want to top everything off by giving haste to your entire squadron. He's also a great commander for Dragon decks, of course. Even played straightforwardly in a 60-card deck, he might still have a purpose. I mean, all those 7-mana Dragons, some of which even have haste but on a severely inferior body, have something to learn from Karrthus. He doesn't even allow for Dragons to be on the opponent's side! That's hardcore!
  • Rating: 8

77. 

  • Name: Keiga, the Tide Star   >> summary
  • Sets: Champions of Kamigawa, Modern Masters
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Spirit
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Among the Dragon Spirits, Yosei and Kokusho might be better, due to their combo applications, but Keiga is the one you want to have in any general situation. She hits hard, and makes blocking (and sometimes attacking) a tricky proposition for the opponent. Plus, you can try and recur her to watch any aggro deck squirm.
  • Rating: 8

78. 

  • Name: Kilnmouth Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Legions, Duel Decks: Knights vs. Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Oh look, a 7-mana 5/5 Dragon! How original! Well, shut up, Kuma, because Kilnmouth Dragon puts amplify on top of the old Obligatory Dragon shell, and amplify is tribal and cool. Amplify 3, no less, so with just two other Dragons in hand (we are playing a Dragon deck in this scenario), Kilnmouth becomes an 11/11 that "pings" for 6 damage. Granted, not the easiest thing to pull off, but, you know, amplify doesn't disdain cheating stuff into play (Eureka, anyone? With Karrthus ending the sequence of drops? A guy can dream). Let's hear a hooray for that amazing, nearly forgotten mechanic that is amplify!
  • Rating: 7

79. 

  • Name: Knollspine Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Shadowmoor
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Knollspine Dragon's ability is a bit convoluted to trigger, in that you need to attack with something else (hopefully another big guy), then drop this to discard the stuff you didn't want (or wanted to discard) and refill your hand. It's definitely something meant for a fattie deck fueled by cheating-into-play effects, but what gives it a bonus grade is the fact that at the end of the day it's an ETB effect that happens right away, not something you have to clunkily wait for until your guy actually gets to attack and/or deals damage, in more typical Dragon fashion.
  • Rating: 7

80. 

  • Name: Kokusho, the Evening Star   >> summary
  • Sets: Champions of Kamigawa, From the Vault: Dragons, Modern Masters
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Spirit
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Kokusho might be the most feared of the Kamigawa Dragons (well, maybe right after Yosei, especially the moment Yosei manages to lock the game down). He has the strong, almost Titan-esque build of all the Dragon Spirits, and I might actually like him better than Grave Titan, in that 6 mana for a Shivan Dragon body is really fair enough when there's so much more going on, on top of that: Kokusho's massive Drain Life is just game-altering. But of course, a random Kokusho appearance isn't nearly as impressive as a perfectly organized Kokusho strategy. He's just so good with Recurring Nightmare, for instance. But you just have to choose your favorite recursion engine, really. Including "replaying him over and over again from the Command Zone", because at the time of this update, there's no such thing as creatures banned as commander anymore, except in Duel Commander (where Kokusho is perfectly legal, though). Under the revised Legend Rule he has gotten a bit worse, in that a simultaneous presence of two Kokushos on the board doesn't result in that astounding 20-life switch anymore. Then again, now you can attack with one and then keep the second one to block. Sky's the limit. Literally, since he's a flyer.
  • Rating: 9

81. 

  • Name: Kolaghan, the Storm's Fury   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: Kolaghan is essentially a 5/5 flyer for 5 that can attack right away (as her dash cost is equal to her normal cost), which would put her in the same mold as its majesty Thundermaw Hellkite. Except dash is not haste. Like I noted for Archwing Dragon, as advantageous as it is not to leave your big guy on the table for your opponent to eliminate during their turn, you still find yourself with what basically amounts to a permanent echo cost. And the bigger the Dragon (Kolaghan has, when attacking, one point of power and toughness more than Archwing Dragon, for one additional mana), the higher the cost you'll have to pay every turn, or else Kolaghan will sort of lose sense. She also comes with a boost to other attacking Dragons, that however seems insignificant, as it's hard to apply (since it's kinda hard to have that many Dragons on the battlefield at the same time). Side note: isn't it nice that three out of the five Tarkir Elders (namely Atarka, Dromoka and Kolaghan) are female?
  • Rating: 6

82. 

  • Name: Lightning Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Urza's Saga, Vintage Masters
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Back in Urza's Saga times, the price to have a Shivan Dragon two turns earlier was: a -1/-1 to its basic stats, and freaking echo. So you pay 8 over two turns rather than 6 in the same turn. There's some strategical value in this based on curve optimization, but you still risk to waste a whole turn paying the echo cost only to get an instant removal in response. Not entirely obsolete yet, but getting there fast.
  • Rating: 5

83. 

  • Name: Lightning Shrieker   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Affiliation: Kolaghan
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Fate Reforged included two full cycles of five Dragons each: the 5 rare Elders (still without the Elder subtype, as that was the past and they were younger then), plus 5 monocolored uncommons linked to the former. To round up the number of Dragons in the set to eleven, there was also this one, somehow still part of Kolaghan's team: the first common Dragon in the game since Dragon Hatchling from Magic 2013, and the second overall to be printed under that rarity (the following year, the uncommon Dragon Egg would be reprinted as a common). So, how is it? Well, for the same cost, it hits as hard and as fast as Thundermaw Hellkite, but it's even better, because it also has trample! What's the catch, then? Well, it hits once, and then goes away, reshuffled into the library. Yeah, it's basically a weird kind of damage spell, not too far removed from a Beacon of Destruction that only targets the opponent. It gets point for the rich history and quasi-unique status, though. And, you know, maybe with Sundial of the Infinite? (Except, at that point it would require a grand total of 6 mana to work, so it'd be sort of pointless).
  • Rating: 5

84. 

  • Name: Lotus Guardian   >> summary
  • Set: Invasion
  • Additional Type: Artifact
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: As cool as it sounds to field the Dragon that actually watches over the Black Lotus, a 7-mana mana dork (or a 7-mana 4/4 for that matter) is exactly halfway between pointless and moronic.
  • Rating: 3

85. 

  • Name: Malfegor   >> summary
  • Sets: Conflux, Commander
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Demon
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: I don't know that Malfegor's "discard to kill" strategy is really effective elsewhere, but he's kinda strong as a commander, mostly because of that "each opponent" wording. So there's that. And, oh, he's a Demon. I remember a joke about how he's affected by both the protections of Baneslayer Angel, yet he can still kill her with his ETB effect.
  • Rating: 5

86. 

  • Name: Mana-Charged Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Commander
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: A multiplayer-based Shivan Dragon (with trample, conveniently) where the firebreathing is activatable by any player, to have fun seeing how much one of your opponents hates another, but not much more than that. Except it's still strictly better than Shivan Dragon, due to the free trample capability and colorless pumping.
  • Rating: 7

87. 

  • Name: Mindscour Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Affiliation: Ojutai
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: And of course, within the FRF cycle of uncommons, blue gets the milling attack, which is something that either is expressly part of your endgame (in which case, you're certainly better off not using a 6-mana dork to achieve it), or will end up doing nothing, if not actively helping the opponent on occasion. Can I say "meh"?
  • Rating: 3

88. 

  • Name: Mirrorwing Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Eldritch Moon
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: You read all that text and, at first, you're like, "That's a very complicated way to give hexproof". But then you realize you can profit from the copies of beneficial spells, too. And then you also realize that there are things that target a single creature and have unexpected side effects, like drawing cards (there was a whole proposed Standard deck built around Expedite and Mirrorwing Dragon). Nice Johnny card, which is something the Dragon tribe doesn't get often.
  • Rating: 7

89. 

  • Name: Mist Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Mirage
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Everything that's able to escape removal is good in my book, even if that phasing ability is definitely overcosted to the point of being almost useless. The gains flying/loses flying thing is also a bit baffling. I assume it's meant to dribble Hurricane and the like? It is a really elusive beast, this one.
  • Rating: 5

90. 

  • Name: Moltensteel Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: New Phyrexia
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: This has always gotten less credit than it was due. It's for a specific type of deck, sure, but it's endgame there, since if you have dealt enough damage to your opponent (say, via burn), and then you drop this one for 4, next turn you can go all in with your remaining life and seal the deal. Okay, it's far-fetched more often than not, given that the ratio is 2 life for 1 damage, but I swear I saw people pull it off! Against me, even!
  • Rating: 6

91. 

  • Name: Moonveil Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Dark Ascension
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: After a while, it becomes hard to tell apart all these mono-red, high-curve Dragons, doesn't it? Here comes another Shivan Dragon variant, this time with universal firebreathing. Once again, strictly better than the original. How much better? I can't tell anymore. I like the art with the fancy slender Dragon against the moon, though. Also Thalia's quote indicating that this is indeed a good guy. How much of a good guy? I can't tell anymore.
  • Rating: 6

92. 

  • Name: Mordant Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Worldwake, Duel Decks: Knights vs. Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: 6 mana... mono-red... 5/5... Shivan Dragon... firebreathing... whenever... combat damage... Somebody help me! They're all the same! THEY ARE ALL THE SAME! This one kills creatures, though. So it's a bit better? I guess? And it's "mordant". That's gotta be a good thing.
  • Rating: 7

93. 

  • Name: Nalathni Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Promo
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 2
  • Evaluation: This is noteworthy because it's one of the first (and, thankfully, last) playable cards that was released only as a promo (during Dragon Con 1994, so when Magic was still a fairly new thing). Other than that, it's a tiny, tiny Dragon that costs as much as Dragon Whelp, has the same limited firebreathing of Dragon Whelp, but trades most of this power and toughness for... banding. Or bands. Or whatever that is. These days, I don't even want to remember how banding/bands/band with other worked.
  • Rating: 3

94. 

  • Name: Necromaster Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Silumgar
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: I don't exactly grasp the conceptual link between blue Zombie-generators and milling, but it appears to be a thing (e.g Lich Lord of Unx, Undead Alchemist, Stitcher Geralf). This Necromaster Dragon is not terrible, but it's not great, either; the two mana you have to pay on top of connecting are annoying and, again, the random milling is bound to be pointless (or even detrimental) most of the times.
  • Rating: 5

95.  

  • Name: Nicol Bolas   >> summary
  • Sets: Legends, Time Spiral "Timeshifted", From the Vault: Dragons
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 14
  • Evaluation: Of all the pathetic Elder Dragons, Nicol Bolas in his pre-planeswalker form is the only one who might still be actually worth playing. Mostly because, it goes without saying, he's Nicol freaking Bolas. But also because the effect of a successful rendezvous with the opponent's face is pretty devastating.
  • Rating: 6

96. 

  • Name: Niv-Mizzet, Dracogenius   >> summary
  • Sets: Return to Ravnica, Modern Masters 2017
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Wizard
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind is just great. The reversed incarnation, Niv-Mizzet, Dracogenius, despite being a bit more buffed, loses all the comboliciousity which was based on...
  • Rating: 2.229299363µ

97.  

  • Name: Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind   >> summary
  • Sets: Guildpact, Modern Masters 2015, From the Vault: Dragons, Duel Decks: Izzet vs. Golgari
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Wizard
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Curiosity, of course, the card Niv-Mizzet is really famous for; makes for a clever infinite-loop endgame combo that's really worth of his machinations, and we can really say that...
  • Rating: 8 ⅔

98. 

  • Name: Noxious Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Affiliation: Silumgar
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: The Fate Reforged uncommon cycle has green and black as the only colors that use death as a trigger, which is appropriately Golgari. Destroying a cheaper creature could sometimes be more useful than destroying a noncreature, but not always, and the latter is generally more powerful. Still, we're still talking of casting a bad, overcosted flyer and then having it die, so the two strategic outcomes even themselves out.
  • Rating: 3

99. 

  • Name: Numot, the Devastator   >> summary
  • Sets: Planar Chaos, Commander
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: The Planar Chaos cycle of Primeval Dragons from an alternate reality means business. Where the red-centric Darigaaz would just do a few damage, his counter-part Numot kills land upon land!
  • Rating: 7

100.  

  • Name: Ojutai, Soul of Winter   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 11
  • Evaluation: If Ojutai's valet, Icefall Regent, was trying to channel Frost Titan, Ojutai himself has exactly Frost Titan's tapping ability. Well, no, not exactly, since you can't tap lands with this one, which is indeed a big deal, because this way the presence of a meaningful target is not guaranteed. In exchange, Ojutai confers his ability to his fellow Dragons on your team (it also borrows vigilance from Sun Titan, in homage to the white component of his casting cost). It might not mean much, because as already noted, it's not that you'll ever be able to have a large amount of Dragons on the battlefield at once, and by "large", I mean more than two at best. (Although, maybe using creatures with changeling in place of actual Dragons?). Plus, it's more expensive than Frost Titan, even if it's the owner of a nice flying body. I can see Ojutai being a pain for the opponent occasionally, yet just being an overcosted Mahamoti Djinn at other times.
  • Rating: 7

101. 

102. 

  • Name: Palladia-Mors   >> summary
  • Set: Legends
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 14
  • Evaluation: Despite the macho attitude depicted in the (quite horrible) card's art, Palladia-Mors is apparently the only lady among the five Elder Dragons. A very bossy lady who tramples all over you, and for that she gets a marginally less horrific grade.
  • Rating: 3

103. 

  • Name: Pardic Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Time Spiral, Modern Masters
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: So, Time Spiral did the suspend version of Shivan Dragon. Because, of course it did. Then ruined everything (?) by adding that frankly unnecessary and weird clause about Pardic Dragon essentially never being able to actually be cast as long as the opponent does something, which is what most opponents tend to do in most games.
  • Rating: 4

104. 

  • Name: Pearl Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Mirage, Sixth Edition
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: The Mirage design team decided that Arcades Sabboth's toughness-pumping mechanic worked so well, that it needed to be done again. Only, a little worse, because it probably turned out to be too powerful or something. And you know, white is all about defense, after all. As easily proved by such creatures as Akroma, Angel of Wrath or Angel of Serenity, that are all about making everyone feel safe and at peace, and not certainly about smashing faces and exiling creatures.
  • Rating: 1

105. 

  • Name: Phantasmal Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Magic 2012, Duel Decks: Jace vs. Vraska
  • Additional Type: Illusion
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Let's be honest here: Phantasmal Dragon is an Illusion much more than it's a Dragon. In fact, it's literally the illusion of a dragon! But they still accept it in Dragon circles, so it's all good. I doubt a Dragon deck would play it, though, unless someone wanted to do a blue-based Dragon deck for some reason (and why shouldn't they, anyway? They have Keiga, Quicksilver Dragon, and the Izzet ones), in which case this is a very strong early midrange presence.
  • Rating: 8

106. 

  • Name: Predator Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Shards of Alara
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: All right, this is, once again, a different take on Shivan Dragon, but it's also a competent design, because it gets haste and devour 2, which conspire to make it worthwhile. In fact, this guy ate its fair share of Elves during its successful career (before being replaced by Ezuri, the Eldrazi, and other nasty things), in order to gloriously rush towards the opponent's face with a ton of +1/+1 counters on its back.
  • Rating: 8

107. 

  • Name: Preyseizer Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Planechase 2012 
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Remember Predator Dragon? (Yes, you remember it, it's right above! Are you really reading this by randomly jumping around from the summary?) This card from Planechase is Predator Dragon without haste. See how it does NOT work anymore? They gave it a damage dealing ability instead, so that's not entirely horrible, but it's not the same explosive thing that it was before, back in the good old times of Dragon #106.
  • Rating: 6

108. 

  • Name: Pristine Skywise   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Ojutai
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: This one borrows name and ability from Pristine Angel, while stile managing to be strictly worse, since it doesn't get protection from artifacts nor from all colors simultaneously, and it's not being untapped when casting creatures (admittedly, it'd only make sense with flash creatures, but still). Also, of course, it requires one color more compared to the Angel. Weirdly enough, the addition of blue only caused a boost in power. Or maybe that's just due to being a Dragon. Anyway, it's serviceable, and fun enough, but nothing much.
  • Rating: 6

109. 

  • Name: Prossh, Skyraider of Kher   >> summary
  • Set: Commander 2013
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: This amazing Jund commander is a very effective one-shot token-generator, capable of creating 6 Kobolds the first time you cast him, then upping the number more and more and each new recursion, exploiting a design specifically conceived around the fact that a commander enters and leaves the Command Zone multiple times during a game, with their casting cost increasing consequently. On top of that, Prossh is also a reliable sacrifice outlet with no activation cost, that takes advantage of the bunch of 0/1 tokens he summoned, or whatever else you'll be able and willing to send to the graveyard to buff him. The strategical and tactical values of Prossh are multifaceted.
  • Rating: 9

110. 

  • Name: Quicksilver Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Onslaught, Duel Decks: Jace vs. Chandra
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Morph is always kinda good, isn't it? In this case, it makes this fairly strong blue Dragon playable as a 5 CMC creature. Not earth-shattering, but solid. And that ability, despite the clumsy wording, is effective enough in being "it's not hexproof but you better not target it nonetheless" (unless there's no creatures on the opponent's side, of course).
  • Rating: 7

111. 

  • Name: Rakdos Pit Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Dissension, Duel Decks: Jace vs. Chandra
  • Converted Mana Cost: 
  • Body: 
  • Evaluation: Rakdos Pit Dragon was once a thing in a deck called Dragon Stompy. It was good there because the deck was able to reach hellbent status easily, so this thing was able to do a lot of double striking damage for just 4 mana (and some activations, where needed). It's a bit of an odd duck if compared to more contemporary creatures, but still potentially stronger than Dragon Whelp, which it was clearly modeled after.
  • Rating: 7

112. 

  • Name: Rathi Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Tempest, Ninth Edition
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: As RexDart recounted in his history of competitive Dragons, despite the double land sacrifice, Rathi Dragon was heavily played at some point because it was really low on the curve. Unlike with Lightning Dragon and its stupid echo, this was actually a huge tempo gain, and the deck was built in such a way that it wouldn't care about the loss of two lands. Plus, this is an actual, honest-to-God 5/5 flyer for 4, with no body reduction or other shenanigans whatsoever. Of course, we live in another era now, so we don't need to destroy our own mountains anymore. There were just wilder times.
  • Rating: 6

113. 

  • Name: Rimescale Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Coldsnap
  • Additional Type: Snow
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Obligatory Dragon from Coldsnap. And all that cold somehow gave a red creature an ability that feels more typical of a blue creature. And it's even a solid ability at that, if certainly mana-intensive, provided your mana base is conveniently snow-covered.
  • Rating: 6

114.  

  • Name: Rith, the Awakener   >> summary
  • Sets: Invasion, Duel Decks: Phyrexia vs. the Coalition, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Rith (you can read her story here) does a great job of being the best of the Primeval Dragons. Sure, if she's the only creature on the battlefield, she'll probably just create 1 token out of her first successful connection (then she'll increase exponentially from there); then again, if she's the only creature on the battlefield and able to connect, you're probably already in a good place. Chances are she'll be able to achieve inevitability through Saprolings, which is a crazy, cool thing to do for a Dragon. And as a token-making, Naya-colored commander, she gets a lot of interactions with cards like Parallel Lives, Doubling Season, Overrun, or even Purphoros.
  • Rating: 8

115.  

  • Name: Rorix Bladewing   >> summary
  • Sets: Onslaught, Planechase, Vintage Masters, Eternal Masters
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 11
  • Evaluation: For a Legendary creature, Rorix is pretty straightforward: he just swings for 6, and he does it right now. There are way worse legends in this list. Way, waaay worse.
  • Rating: 7

116. 

  • Name: Runehorn Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Commander 2016 (online in Treasure Chests)
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: This is just a typical big Dragon shell, along the classic lines of Shivan Dragon, that doubles as a "flashback" Wheel of Fortune. Of course that's double the cost of a Wheel of Fortune, understandably. But it's instant-speed, at least. A great card for decks that like to dump stuff into the graveyard (which is something red is known for, e.g. Faithless Looting, Cathartic Reunion). If you happen to need a fattie, here it comes; otherwise, spin the wheel.
  • Rating: 6

117. 

  • Name: Ruthless Deathfang   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Silumgar
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Ah, I like this one! Grave Pact on legs! Sort of. It only works if your creature is also sacrificed, but most of the times, a Grave Pact deck aims to do just that anyway. The real problem is, why should I use a somewhat fragile 6-mana creature rather than an enchantment? Well, sure, I can use it in addition to, but it still doesn't sound like a very sleek plan, as this doesn't add pretty much anything to that overall strategy. I like that the Silumgar's quote in the flavor text says "translated from Draconic". Because every other character that's not a Dragon speaks English, instead?
  • Rating: 5

118. 

  • Name: Ryusei, the Falling Star   >> summary
  • Sets: Champions of Kamigawa, Modern Masters
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Spirit
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: As a Dragon Spirit's death trigger, Earthquake for 5 (sparing players) is nothing to sneeze at. But the problem with Ryusei is that most of his cycle siblings are so great at what they do, than even sweeping the board seems inconclusive and lame when compared to permanently stealing stuff, draining life, or negating play. Still, he's not without praises, even if he sees definitely less play than all the others, with the only exception of that dork Jugan.
  • Rating: 7

119. 

  • Name: Savage Ventmaw   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Atarka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Well, that's definitely a lot of mana Savage Ventmaw gives you at each attack. It essentially gives back its casting cost again and again. It's the kind of win-more ramp that sends you from 6 to 12, but I can see how that's something certain decks might want, especially in larger-than-life formats like Commander. The main trick is having the Ventmaw survive the attack, but it's a flyer after all, it's not bound to find too many chump-blockers with deathtouch up there in the air.
  • Rating: 7

120. 

  • Name: Scion of the Ur-Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Time Spiral
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Avatar
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: The Ur-Dragon is the all-mighty spirit of all dragonkind. Its scion (term that I suppose is used here in the sense of "guardian") is capable of embodying every dragon in existence. By, uhm, killing them and taking their aspect for a brief while. Whatever. This is a clear build-around-me card, and if you do build around it, which includes finding a more or less honest way to drop a 5-color creature onto the battlefield (the only pentacolor Dragon in existence), your deck will do a Dragon Parade Spectacular, especially in Commander. Otherwise, it won't do much and you will wonder what the hell you were thinking when you put Scion of the Ur-Dragon in a deck without any other Dragon. (UPDATE: It's also an Avatar, but its ability doesn't work with those, so it's wasted among other Avatars as well, if not merely for pentacolored shenanigans).
  • Rating: 7

121. 

  • Name: Scion of Ugin   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Additional Type: Spirit
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: It's very nice to get a colorless, non-artifact, Spirit Dragon affiliated with Ugin (let's not forget Fate Reforged gave us the second Dragon planeswalker of the game, after Conflux's Nicol Bolas). Too bad it's just an overcosted French vanilla guy who does exactly nothing.
  • Rating: 2

122. 

  • Name: Scourge of Kher Ridges   >> summary
  • Set: Future Sight
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: A quasi-Pyroclasm and a quasi-Inferno are certainly good tricks to keep at hand, but 8 mana to drop this quite unimaginative Obligatory Dragon feel at least one too many.
  • Rating: 5

123. 

  • Name: Scourge of Nel Toth   >> summary
  • Set: Commander 2015 (online in Legendary Cube Prize Packs)
  • Additional Type: Zombie
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: So this one, which not coincidentally is also a Zombie, screams build around me, but in a gentle, not-too-Johnny way. You just want a deck with an early discard outlet, like, say, Putrid Imp, then something that's easy to sacrifice to the Scourge, like, say, Gravecrawler. And oh, look, they're all Zombies, too! So then, voilà, here's your turn-3 (turn-2 with one Dark Ritual involved, turn-1 with two Dark Rituals!) 6/6 evasive finisher that's actually hard to get rid of, since those Gravecrawlers come back because of it, and then it comes back because of them (barring exile). Sounds like a plan. (This thing would break Modern if it were legal there).
  • Rating: 9

124. 

  • Name: Scourge of the Throne   >> summary
  • Sets: Conspiracy, Vintage Masters
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Conspiracy's Shivan Dragon is, of course, a better Shivan Dragon. Not strictly, because it lacks firebreathing, but has a chance of triggering an additional combat phase for free, which is probably going to be more damaging than pumping, and it doesn't require tapping any red mana (so, yeah, maybe it is strictly better). In multiplayer, it was meant to encourage attacking the player who's currently ahead; it even grows bigger if it does that, thanks to the dethrone mechanic. In 1v1, the opponent is initially always "tied for most life" with you, although by the time Scourge of the Throne attacks, who knows what the life totals will be. That becomes the tricky part, then: if you never manage to be behind, this becomes actually a strictly worse Shivan Dragon; but if you trigger at leat one additional combat phase (along with a +1/+1 counter), it might be worth it. Of course, after probably having inflicted a minimum of 11 damage that way, it's hard to imagine it'll repeat its trick anytime soon. And it remains all very Timmy-esque, it must be said.
  • Rating: 6

125. 

 

  • Name: Scourge of Valkas   >> summary
  • Set: Magic 2014
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: The modern era of the 5-mana Dragons started in Magic 2013 with the explosive success story of Thundermaw Hellkite. One year later, this Scourge of Valkas was definitely more subdued, with a smaller body and just the old firebreathing, plus an ETB effect that's never going to be especially impressive, if not in a Dragonstorm deck, where it doesn't really matter. Still, a bit of removal is better than no removal at all, and some midrange-oriented Dragon tribal decks have been known to actually include this guy with some success.
  • Rating: 6

126. 

  • Name: Shieldhide Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Dromoka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 6
  • Evaluation: Here we are again, another one of the monocolored uncommons from Dragons of Tarkir. I suppose lifelink is the more effective keyword of the cycle, so just imagine I gave this dude a slightly higher rating which was then rounded down to just the same.
  • Rating: 3

127.    

  • Name: Shivan Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Alpha to 5th Edition, 7th Edition to Magic 2010, Magic 2014, Magic 2015, Magic Origins, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: So, 25 years later, is Shivan Dragon any good anymore? I'm afraid it's not, there are so many variants of it that I've lost the count, and you can play a 6-mana 5/5 Dragon that has one or more relevant abilities than just firebreathing. But you know, it still does its job as a finisher, if you like, and firebreathing can still be relevant, even after all this time. Plus, I don't have the heart to give it too much of bad grade. I just don't.
  • Rating: 6

128.  

  • Name: Shivan Hellkite   >> summary
  • Sets: Urza's Saga, Tenth Edition, Duel Decks: Knights vs. Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Shivan Hellkite is the Master Pinger of Dragons. Again, it's Shivan Dragon ver X.0 for one mana more and the classic firebreathing replaced with a solid damage-dealing mana dump. Does it make it better? After all those many oh-so-slightly different versions of the same basic thing, I really can't tell at this point. Most of these aren't terrible, but almost all of these are for casual play, and in casual play you can make almost every Dragon that's not Elder Land Wurm work.
  • Rating: 6

129. 

  • Name: Shockmaw Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Affiliation: Kolaghan
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: You know, as far as this uncommon cycle goes, hitting the entire enemy team upon connection is not even terrible. In fact, it can be the bane of certain archetypes, like Tokens.dek or even Goblins.dek. Or you can just use Electrickery.
  • Rating: 4

130. 

  • Name: Siege Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Magic 2015
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: I'm a sucker for Dragons that make short shrift of the opponent's puny creatures. Mini-Earthquake in Pyroclasm size? Yes, thanks. And how flavorful is it for a Siege Dragon to destroy all Walls? Very, that's how. "If defending player controls no Walls" is just such a wonderful clause, it reminds me of a time when Magic was more inspired by what the cards actually represented. Of course, at the end of the day, this is just another too costly fattie that must attack at least once to have some meaning (unless you're facing a Wall deck for some reason; in which case, damn you're lucky).
  • Rating: 6

131. 

  • Name: Silumgar, the Drifting Death   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Silumgar as a young Dragon has a more lethal, indestructible-proof version of limited sweeping abilities like Shockmaw Dragon's. It's also, weirdly, way stronger than his Elder version, and arguably the best of the Fate Reforged rare Dragons (which is quite the reversal compared to his relatively poor performance in the future cycle). I mean, hexproof rather than deathtouch? And his butt was bigger back then? The killer ability also stacks with the attacks of all other Dragons (that's something all the FRF Dragon bosses have in common: they're unquestionably tribal lords). Considering hexproof will make him stick around, and his ability is removal to some extent, young Silumgar only lacks a a bigger punch to be truly excellent.
  • Rating: 8

132. 

  • Name: Skithiryx, the Blight Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Scars of Mirrodin
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Skeleton
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Skithiryx is the Obligatory Infect Dragon from SOM block. But he's more than that: he's a very strong infect finisher for a more midrange type of infect deck, and also works on his own, especially as a commander, given that he can kill an opponent in just 3 attacks. He can also attack right away if you pay 1 mana more. More so, it's a 5-mana Dragon from before it was cool. And there should be more Skeleton Dragons, or Skeleton Anything, because undead made from the bony remains of strange creatures is just a brilliant concept that Magic doesn't exploit enough.
  • Rating: 8

133. 

  • Name: Skyline Despot   >> summary
  • Set: Conspiracy: Take the Crown (online: Treasure Chests)
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Let's consider for a moment that being the monarch means you're drawing a card in the end step, i.e. almost right away (barring instant removal). Then if Skyline Despot sticks around for at least one turn, the net gain is one card and one 5/5 flying token. Well, okay, you also need to receive combat damage in the opponent's turn. But hey, you have a big Dragon as a bodyguard, no? What I'm getting at is that the card advantage generated by the Despot is potentially huge, so one could make a case for it as a reanimation target. I know, competition is steep in that regard, and this is neither Griselbrand nor has hexproof or any protection from removal. But let's mix things up every so often!
  • Rating: 6

134. 

  • Name: Skyship Stalker   >> summary
  • Set: Kaladesh
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 6
  • Evaluation: More than a Dragon, this feels like a red Phantom Monster with the ability to mimic stuff Dragons do. Too mana-intensive, too below the curve.
  • Rating: 4

135. 

  • Name: Slumbering Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Magic 2013
  • Converted Mana Cost: 1
  • Body: 6
  • Evaluation: I know this is never going to be a super-serious card, but I actually like it a lot more than other attempts at "early-turns Dragons". For starters, it's a 1-drop Dragon, which is obviously unprecedented (and what's more "early" than that?). And against aggro, it's just going to give the opponent pause in a way or another. Are they going to bolt what amounts to a pacified creature? And if not, do they realize that in two or three turns it's going to become an active 8/8 flyer? And you just spent a single mana on it, and waited.
  • Rating: 7

136. 

  • Name: Spawn of Thraxes   >> summary
  • Set: Journey into Nyx
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: A revised Fire Dragon. Now it costs two mana less, down to a more manageable 7, and most importantly, it can hit the opponent. It's still not brilliant, because it needs those Mountains on the battlefield, so you don't get too much value from cheating it into play earlier; it's a late game guy, and as such, it seems poorly positioned pretty much everywhere: other Dragons, like Dragonlord Atarka, are more flexible removal engines, or guarantee a damage quota, like Bogardan Hellkite. You could dump the Spawn into the graveyard and recur it later, dealing more and more damage at every passage. If you're willing to experiment a little, that is. Now at least you can, with Fire Dragon you would just get a questionable creature killer with no chances of fueling an endgame.
  • Rating: 6

137. 

  • Name: Spellbound Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Alara Reborn
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Back when there weren't many valid choices for a Dragon under 6 CMC, I used to play with this one a lot in Dragon tribal. And I actually still like it quite enough, as it's capable of explosive damage when you draw into a bigger Dragon, and you can control the discard, so it's actually a card advantage engine most of the times (or a reanimation enabler in specific builds). And I appreciate its high toughness: you may want your early Dragons to be apt at playing defense, while they wait for the huge ones to come.
  • Rating: 8

138. 

  • Name: Steel Hellkite   >> summary
  • Sets: Scars of Mirrodin, Commander 2014
  • Additional Type: Artifact
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: The power of this mechanical Dragon is second only to the stubbornness with which it was dismissed in the early phases of its career. Somehow, the fact that it has to connect (which, admittedly, is usually a crappy clause) prevented players to see past the first impression and right into the fact that it's actually repeatable Engineered Explosives. Luckily, in later times its street cred has improved, and you could see it pop up even in Workshop-based Legacy lists and sometimes in Modern Tron. I'm glad it found some degree of recognition, since I seriously consider it a contender with Wurmcoil Engine for the title of best 6-mana colorless creature, and Wurmcoil Engine is often better than the Titans themselves.
  • Rating: 9

139. 

  • Name: Stormbreath Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Theros
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Theros had exactly one Dragon, but it was one of the greatest ever printed. Not entirely Thundermaw Hellkite good, but close enough, most notably trading one point of power and toughness and the flyer hate for the extremely important "protection from Swords to Plowshares, Path to Exile, Oblivion Ring, and Detention Sphere". The monstrosity trigger is kind of random and probably not going to deal much damage by the time you hit 7 mana, but it's nice to have the chance to instantly turn your scary finisher into a scarier finisher, even if the high activation cost means it won't always get there.
  • Rating: 9

140. 

  • Name: Stormwing Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Kolaghan
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 6
  • Evaluation: I can't remember if this cycle was ever played much in DTK Limited, but I can easily picture these guys being constantly dropped as 2/2s for 3, then remaining that way for the remainder of their presence in the game, and probably used to chump block.
  • Rating: 3

141. 

  • Name: Sunscorch Regent   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Dromoka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 7
  • Evaluation: This is a strange ability for a Dragon, but it befits a monowhite Dragon. It's also pretty strong: don't let that toughness fool you, this guy can't be bolted. And it grows as fast as Taurean Mauler. Which is oftentimes insanely fast. I've never seen this played at all, which may be due to the overcrowding of the CMC 5 spot, with so many alternative options for the kind of midrange Selesnya or Naya build this seems made for (it's the same reason Vorapede, albeit first-rate, never see play). This doesn't mean it's not an outstanding creature in its own right. By the way, the art depicts how all Dromoka's Dragons breath light. It's kind of silly.
  • Rating: 8

142. 

  • Name: Swift Warkite   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Kolaghan
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: I'm not sure what they wanted to do with this one. For 6 mana, you get an underwhelming 4/4 vanilla flyer, but also a smaller creature for one turn. Like, okay. I guess the main value comes from the option of recovering the target from the graveyard. Kind of a convoluted, overcosted Gravedigger. It's just an uncommon, after all. But so is Gravedigger.
  • Rating: 4

143. 

  • Name: Tarox Bladewing   >> summary
  • Set: Future Sight
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 7
  • Evaluation: This descendant of Rorix is an attempt at a proto-Thundermaw Hellkite that just lacks the necessary upper (and lower) body strength. 5 mana and haste are all good, but that toughness 3 is just hard to digest, and grandeur, while typically a good ability, isn't reliable enough to make up for it.
  • Rating: 5

144. 

  • Name: Teeka's Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Mirage
  • Additional Type: Artifact
  • Converted Mana Cost: 9
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Let me get this straight: according to Teeka, I should pay 3 mana more than Shivan Dragon in order to get trample and... rampage? Oh, rampage 4, sure. That's a lot of rampage. Give me a break, Teeka.
  • Rating: 3

145. 

  • Name: Tek   >> summary
  • Set: Invasion
  • Additional Type: Artifact
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 4
  • Evaluation: So, if you have a land for each type (or a Prismatic Omen), Tek will be... let's see... a 4/4 with flying, trample and first strike? Yeah, I think I'll pass.
  • Rating: 1

146. 

  • Name: Teneb, the Harvester   >> summary
  • Sets: Planar Chaos
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Teneb has just the most powerful ability of any Primeval Dragon, from the main reality or any other. A 3-mana reanimation spell each time he connects is just insane. And it all becomes even crazier when he's played as a commander, since he's able to grab guys from any graveyard.
  • Rating: 9

147.  

  • Name: Thunder Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Starter 1999, Duel Decks: Knights vs. Dragons, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Thunder Dragon is a surprisingly strong card for something that debuted in a starter set. Why aren't there more Dragons with this kind of anti-ground ETB effect? I could definitely use more. Great reanimation/recursion target for sure, and it comes with a solid body as well. Too bad it isn't legal in Modern.
  • Rating: 8

148. 

  • Name: Thunderbreak Regent   >> summary
  • Set: Dragons of Tarkir
  • Affiliation: Kolaghan
  • Converted Mana Cost: 4
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: I only now realized all the members of the cycle of rare monocolored Dragons from Dragons of Tarkir have "regent" in the name. They're their boss's lieutenants, I guess (although that's not what "regent" means). Anyway, Kolaghan's lieutenant here discourages the opponent from targeting Dragons, which mostly means itself. I think its greater strength is being a 4/4 for 4, actually. But the additional damage that comes from removing it is certainly welcome.
  • Rating: 7

149. 

  • Name: Thundermaw Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Magic 2013
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: That's it. That's the guy. It comes fast, attacks fast, kills tokens, uh, fast. And gets rid of Delver of Secrets and Vendilion Clique, too. And nothing can block its first swing, so it's close to being 5 guaranteed damage on top of everything else. They really went over the top with this Hellkite. By the way, didn't they use the term "hellkite" a bit too much over the years? It seems pretty non-canon for a Dragon, seeing how a kite is just a bird.
  • Rating: 10

150. 

  • Name: Treva, the Renewer   >> summary
  • Sets: Invasion, Duel Decks: Phyrexia vs. the Coalition
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: The Bant take on the Primeval Dragons chose the lifegaining way, as Bant may do. It's not as explosive as what Rith does, and even Dromar looks like he's going to be relevant more often (although he might also turn into a worse Kederekt Leviathan), but mad lifegaining can change the course of a game for sure. Plus, Treva, according to this, is a posh Dragon lady with elegantly feathered wings who "could breathe a shaft of pure light that cuts through steel". All in all, the Invasion cycle is a reliable crowd, and not just because they all make for great commanders, giving access as they do to three colors and an evasive finisher. They're not Titan-level because they have to sit on the battlefield one full turn before they're able to do much of anything, and their ability can be stopped by any Propaganda effect, but some of them are still a solid choice for a 6-mana drop. They don't see play often mostly for lack of suitable formats (they're not even legal in Modern); and after all, the three-color commitment is indeed a bit demanding; but they could wreak moderate to serious havoc, if given the opportunity.
  • Rating: 7

151.  

  • Name: Two-Headed Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Mercadian Masques, Eighth Edition, From the Vault: Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: There's more than a bit of cheesiness on the surface of Two-Headed Dragon. Mostly, it's the really trite idea of "it has two heads, so it blocks two creatures" (which actually doesn't make much sense, but it's a given at this point). It also has a two-headed firebreathing: double the cost, double the effect. And in general, it's the umpteenth version of Shivan Dragon with the mandatory, cosmetic changes (although, to be fair, back in Mercadian Masques times, there weren't umpteen versions of Shivan Dragon yet. Let's say, just half an umpdozen). But the very thing that makes this stand apart a little, and at least enough to result better than most of the other various clones of the Great Dragon Godfather, is the "can't be blocked except by two or more creatures" clause or, in current parlance, menace, an ability that often translates into being outright unblockable. Think about it, you'd actually need two flyers to block this guy, and that doesn't happen too often outside of token decks with Lingering Souls and whatnot. Plus, the firebreathing guarantees both a hard time to these eventual blockers, and a pretty harsh punishment to the opponent that can't in fact block this circus freak dragon.
  • Rating: 7

152. 

  • Name: Tyrant of Valakut   >> summary
  • Set: Oath of the Gatewatch
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 9
  • Evaluation: Of course this must be paid with surge. First of all, because it's a discount. And second of all, because otherwise you're just paying a crazy cost for a generic flying body (like, Venerable Lammasu bad). Now, at 5 mana, with a free Lightning Bolt as a bonus, that's starting to be reasonable. Of course you need to cast something else first. A 0-cost spell would be nice. Clearly, the idea was to timing it up with a teammate in team multiplayer. That's even nicer.
  • Rating: 5

153. 

  • Name: Tyrant's Familiar   >> summary
  • Set: Commander 2014
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: This is Commander-only, obviously, and it's evaluated as such. Commander 2014 had a full cycle of lieutenants, creatures becoming stronger when the commander is around. They're all good, with Stormsurge Kraken's card-drawing and Thunderfoot Baloth's mini-Overrun making for the most effective ones. Tyrant's Familiar is right there with them, though, as a hasty 7/7 that pretty much kills a creature per attack.
  • Rating: 8

154. 

  • Name: Utvara Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Return to Ravnica
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: This might have the same problem of most high-cost creatures, in that you don't want to invest that much actual mana into something that just dies of a common cold, and at the same time you're not going to reanimate it, both for the same reason and because there are probably stronger and safer targets. This said, boy, if you ever pull this off, you'll get a Dragon factory! In a Dragon deck is so insane that you basically won't get the time to enjoy it, since you'll win so fast it's not even funny. Most big flying token creators, especially where Angels are involved, are just content to create 4/4s, but these are freaking 6/6s instead. And you don't need to connect, just the declaration of attack is enough. I know, it's all very Timmy-esque, this thing costs 8 mana and as soon as the opponent sees it, a Doom Blade will materialize into his hand. But let a Timmy dream a little, okay?
  • Rating: 7

155. 

  • Name: Vaevictis Asmadi   >> summary
  • Set: Legends
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Elder
  • Converted Mana Cost: 7
  • Body: 14
  • Evaluation: Did you know that all the Elder Dragons are siblings, but Vaevictis Asmadi is their cousin instead? I'm not making this up, it's true! He's the wacky cousin, and his storyline is full of silly shenanigans like that time he got transformed into a dragon whelp. On top of this, he really likes firebreathing. God, he might just be the worst Jund legend ever.
  • Rating: 1

156. 

  • Name: Vampiric Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Odyssey
  • Converted Mana Cost: 8
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: It's a Vampire and it's a Dragon: it's a Vampire Dragon! With all the powers of a bland Vampire and all the excessive casting cost of a big Dragon. Granted, the Shivan Hellkite-like pinging ability kind of combos with the vampiric growth. More or less, because it's either going to be super-mana-intensive or to work only on small guys, or at most to rely on random occurrences where a creature is dying for some other reason and you ping it in response to get the counter. Which isn't even this big payoff, anyway.
  • Rating: 5

157. 

158.   

  • Name: Volcanic Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Mirage, Sixth Edition, Magic 2012, Portal, Starter 1999
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Fairly harmless hasty Dragon, reprinted across a crazy range of different sets and ages. Entirely obsolete now that there's a certain Dragon with a larger body for a lower cost. And more abilities.
  • Rating: 1

159. 

  • Name: Voracious Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Conflux, Duel Decks: Knights vs. Dragons
  • Converted Mana Cost: 5
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: This can easily be a 5/5 for 5, if you pair it with something that you want to see die, like a Perilous Myr or a Viridian Emissary. Which is good enough. The Goblin-based ability is mostly flavorful, but it could be fun to try and feed it its favorite meal (using Tuktuk the Explorer, maybe?), even if the payoff isn't unbelievable or anything.
  • Rating: 6

160. 

  • Name: Vorosh, the Hunter   >> summary
  • Set: Planar Chaos, Commander
  • Additional Type: Legendary
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 12
  • Evaluation: Vorosh's ability is entirely self-contained: he hits, he grows, so he'll hit harder and he'll grow some more. Nothing strategical nor tactical, really, but plenty of inevitability.
  • Rating: 8

161. 

  • Name: Wardscale Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Fate Reforged
  • Affiliation: Dromoka
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 8
  • Evaluation: Uhm, so, let me understand this one: "is attacking" means during the combat phase but after the attack is declared, so the opponent can still cast instant removal at that point. I guess it prevents combat tricks, and those white spells that make you sacrifice an attacking creature. I don't know, I'll just give it a higher grade than most other members of its cycle because at least it's an unusual ability.
  • Rating: 4

162. 

  • Name: Warmonger Hellkite   >> summary
  • Set: Commander 2014
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Making all creatures attack each turn is going to mess with careful strategies, especially in multiplayer. This guy seems to like the chaotic evil approach, because the truly universal firebreathing is a great tool to stir up discord, engineering mandatory attacks and then nuclearize them, while your warmongering scoundrel Dragon just stays back and grins evilly. Or something. Anyway, it's way less useful in 1v1.
  • Rating: 5

163. 

  • Name: Worldgorger Dragon   >> summary
  • Sets: Judgment, Vintage Masters, Eternal Masters
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 14
  • Evaluation: Worldgorger Dragon is a vastly notorious card due to... the Worldgorger Dragon combo. Which is: Entomb it, then cast Animate Dead on it, then watch the game break into an infinite loop (the aura brings Worldgorger to the battlefield, which instantly causes the aura to leave play, which causes the Dragon to leave play, which causes the aura to return to play, which causes the Dragon to return to play, and so on), while at every step you tap all the mana you need from the lands that keep going back and forth from the exile zone. Then you stop the loop and... probably win. (This combo has been banned in Legacy for ages, but it isn't anymore). I honestly don't think Worldgorger has ever had any other use.
  • Rating: 7

164. 

  • Name: Yosei, the Morning Star   >> summary
  • Sets: Champions of Kamigawa, Modern Masters
  • Additional Types: Legendary, Spirit
  • Converted Mana Cost: 6
  • Body: 10
  • Evaluation: Yosei is the scariest of all the Dragon Spirits. He seems benign, doesn't he? But he'll just cause you a heart attack when he'll start, ehm, dying, and that insane death trigger will tap most of your side of the battlefield threatening to shut you out of the game entirely if the effect recurs. And there are several ways to recur him. My favorite is the Timmiest one: Lifespinner.
  • Rating: 9

165. 

  • Name: Zodiac Dragon   >> summary
  • Set: Portal Three Kingdoms
  • Converted Mana Cost: 9
  • Body: 16
  • Evaluation: Oh, it's so great to have a 9-mana vanilla creature returned to your hand. Lest you wanted to reanimate him. But what am I talking about? If you're playing this thing, you probably don't even know what a reanimator spell is.
  • Rating: 0

STATISTICS

> top <

 Draconic History (first appearances only)

  • Core sets: 13 (Alpha: 2, M11: 2, M12: 2, M13: 3, M14: 2, M15: 1, Magic Origins: 1)
  • Starter sets: 6 (Portal: 3, Portal Second Age: 1, Portal Three Kingdoms: 1, Starter 1999: 1)
  • Special sets: 11 (Commander: 1, Commander 2013: 1, Commander 2014: 2, Commander 2015: 2, Commander 2016: 1, Planechase 2012: 1, Conspiracy: 1, Conspiracy: Take the Crown: 1, Promo: 1)
  • Ancient sets: 6 Legends
  • Ice Age block: 1 Coldsnap
  • Mirage block: 10 (Mirage: 7, Visions: 2, Weatherlight: 1)
  • Tempest block: 2 (Tempest: 1, Exodus: 1)
  • Urza block: 3 (Urza's Saga: 2, Urza's Destiny: 1)
  • Masques block: 2 Mercadian Masques
  • Invasion block: 8 (Invasion: 7, Planeshift: 1)
  • Odyssey block: 3 (Odyssey: 1, Judgment: 2)
  • Onslaught block: 8 (Onslaught: 2, Legions: 2, Scourge: 4)
  • Mirrodin block: 3 (Mirrodin: 1, Darksteel: 1, Fifth Dawn: 1)
  • Kamigawa block: 5 Champions of Kamigawa
  • Ravnica block: 3 (Ravnica: 1, Guildpact: 1, Dissension: 1)
  • Time Spiral block: 10 (Time Spiral: 3, Planar Chaos: 5, Future Sight: 2)
  • Lorwyn/Shadowmoor block: 1 Shadowmoor
  • Alara block: 10 (Shards of Alara: 4, Conflux: 3, Alara Reborn: 3)
  • Zendikar block: 2 (Zendikar: 1, Worldwake: 1)
  • Scars of Mirrodin block: 5 (Scars of Mirrodin: 3, Mirrodin Besieged: 1, New Phyrexia: 1)
  • Innistrad block: 3 (Innistrad: 1, Dark Ascension: 1, Avacyn Restored: 1)
  • Return to Ravnica block: 4 (Return to Ravnica: 3, Gatecrash: 1)
  • Theros block: 3 (Theros: 1, Born of the Gods: 1, Journey into Nyx: 1)
  • Khans of Tarkir block: 37 (Fate Reforged: 11, Dragons of Tarkir: 26)
  • Battle for Zendikar block: 2 (Battle for Zendikar: 1, Oath of the Gatewatch: 1)
  • Shadows over Innistrad block: 1 Eldritch Moon
  • Kaladesh block: 2 (Kaladesh: 1, Aether Revolt: 1)
  • Amonkhet block: 1 Amonkhet

 Conclusions: Dragons have been present in every block since Mirage, with many sets having exactly one (aka the Obligatory Dragon). Prior to that, Dragons was not a frequent type, though, with only 8 of them being printed up until that point. In fact, no Ancient set except Legends featured Dragons. In some cases, there were background reasons for that (Arabian Nights wasn't really suitable, for one). Before the Tarkir explosion, the most draconic blocks were Mirage, Time Spiral and Alara, with 10 new Dragons each. Of course this pales in comparison to the mega-boost brought about by the Tarkir block, with its mind-boggling 37 additions, 26 in Dragons of Tarkir alone, which has appropriately become the most Dragon-friendly set of all (they were the titular creatures, after all).

 Draconic Colors

  • White: 27 (of which 9 mono, 4 Azorius, 4 Selesnya, 2 Bant, 2 Esper, 2 Naya, 1 Mardu, 1 Abzan, 1 Jeskai, 1 pentacolor)
  • Blue: 31 (of which 8 mono, 5 Izzet, 4 Azorius, 4 Dimir, 2 Bant, 2 Esper, 2 Grixis, 1 Temur, 1 Jeskai, 1 Sultai, 1 pentacolor)
  • Black: 33 (of which 8 mono, 7 Rakdos, 6 Jund, 4 Dimir, 2 Esper, 2 Grixis, 1 Mardu, 1 Abzan, 1 Sultai, 1 pentacolor)
  • Red: 109 (of which 76 mono, 7 Rakdos, 7 Gruul, 6 Jund, 5 Izzet, 2 Grixis, 2 Naya, 1 Mardu, 1 Temur, 1 Jeskai, 1 pentacolor)
  • Green: 30 (of which 5 mono, 7 Gruul, 6 Jund, 4 Selesnya, 2 Bant, 2 Naya, 1 Temur, 1 Abzan, 1 Sultai, 1 pentacolor)
  • Colorless: 8 (of which 7 artifacts)

 Conclusions: Dragons are mostly red. No surprise there. But among the other colors, there's a solid presence everywhere, with cycles reinforcing the even distribution, and the Tarkir block especially adding a good number of multicolored Dragons, since 20 of the 37 Tarkir additions are multicolored, including combinations in which they didn't exist before, namely Azorius, Dimir and Selesnya.

 Additional Types

  • Legendary: 40
  • Elder: 10
  • Artifact: 8
  • Spirit: 7
  • Wizard: 3
  • Illusion: 2
  • Wurm: 2
  • Zombie: 2
  • Avatar: 1
  • Demon: 1
  • Snow: 1
  • Skeleton: 1
  • Vampire: 1

 Conclusions: Legends aside (that make up almost one quarter of the total), most Dragons have only the Dragon type. The most common additional types come from particular cycles, like Elder and Spirit. Out of the 8 Artifact Dragons, only one, Moltensteel Dragon, is not colorless.

 Keywords (or so)

  • Flying: 162
  • Firebreathing: 25
  • Haste: 18
  • Trample: 16
  • Morph/Megamorph: 7
  • Devour: 4
  • Double strike: 3
  • First strike: 3
  • Rampage: 2
  • Regeneration: 2
  • Amplify: 1
  • Banding: 1
  • Bolster: 1
  • Dash: 1
  • Deathtouch: 1
  • Echo: 1
  • Exert: 1
  • Fight: 1
  • Flash: 1
  • Grandeur: 1
  • Hexproof: 1
  • Improvise: 1
  • Infect: 1
  • Landfall: 1
  • Lifelink: 1
  • Monstrosity: 1
  • Plainscycling: 1
  • Protection from white: 1
  • Surge: 1
  • Suspend: 1
  • Vigilance: 1

 Conclusions: Not surprisingly, most Dragons fly (except the giant dorks Elder Land Wurm, Henge Guardian, and Zodiac Dragon). The other more common abilities include, of course, firebreathing, then haste and trample. In general, Dragons don't show many other recurring keyworded abilities, with particular specimens getting one-time skills all across the board.

 The Cycles

 Latest Additions


DRAGONPEDIA SUMMARY

> top < 

1. Acid-Spewer Dragon
2. Akoum Hellkite
3. Alabaster Dragon
4. Ancient Hellkite
5. Arashin Sovereign
6. Arcades Sabboth
7. Archwing Dragon
8. Atarka, World Render
9. Avaricious Dragon
10. Balefire Dragon
11. Belltoll Dragon
12. Bladewing the Risen
13. Bogardan Hellkite
14. Boltwing Marauder
15. Brimstone Dragon
16. Broodmate Dragon
17. Canopy Dragon
18. Catacomb Dragon
19. Chromium
20. Clockwork Dragon
21. Cloud Dragon
22. Covetous Dragon
23. Crimson Hellkite
24. Crosis, the Purger
25. Cunning Breezedancer
26. Darigaaz, the Igniter
27. Deathbringer Regent
28. Destructor Dragon
29. Draco
30. Dragon Broodmother
31. Dragon Egg
32. Dragon Hatchling
33. Dragon Mage
34. Dragon Tyrant
35. Dragon Whelp
36. Dragonlord Atarka
37. Dragonlord Dromoka
38. Dragonlord Kolaghan
39. Dragonlord Ojutai
40. Dragonlord Silumgar
41. Dream Pillager
42. Dromar, the Banisher
43. Dromoka, the Eternal
44. Ebon Dragon
45. Elder Land Wurm
46. Enduring Scalelord
47. Eternal Dragon
48. Exalted Dragon
49. Fire Dragon
50. Firestorm Hellkite
51. Flameblast Dragon
52. Fledgling Dragon
53. Foe-Razer Regent
54. Forgestoker Dragon
55. Freejam Regent
56. Furnace Dragon
57. Furnace Whelp
58. Furyborn Hellkite
59. Glorybringer
60. Harbinger of the Hunt
61. Hellkite Charger
62. Hellkite Hatchling
63. Hellkite Igniter
64. Hellkite Overlord
65. Hellkite Tyrant
66. Henge Guardian
67. Herdchaser Dragon
68. Hoarding Dragon
69. Hoard-Smelter Dragon
70. Hunted Dragon
71. Hypersonic Dragon
72. Icefall Regent
73. Imperial Hellkite
74. Intet, the Dreamer
75. Jugan, the Rising Star
76. Karrthus, Tyrant of Jund
77. Keiga, the Tide Star
78. Kilnmouth Dragon
79. Knollspine Dragon
80. Kokusho, the Evening Star
81. Kolaghan, the Storm's Fury
82. Lightning Dragon
83. Lightning Shrieker
84. Lotus Guardian
85. Malfegor
86. Mana-Charged Dragon
87. Mindscour Dragon
88. Mirrorwing Dragon
89. Mist Dragon
90. Moltensteel Dragon
91. Moonveil Dragon
92. Mordant Dragon
93. Nalathni Dragon
94. Necromaster Dragon
95. Nicol Bolas
96. Niv-Mizzet, Dracogenius
97. Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind
98. Noxious Dragon
99. Numot, the Devastator
100. Ojutai, Soul of Winter
101. Oros, the Avenger
102. Palladia-Mors
103. Pardic Dragon
104. Pearl Dragon
105. Phantasmal Dragon
106. Predator Dragon
107. Preyseizer Dragon
108. Pristine Skywise
109. Quicksilver Dragon
110. Rakdos Pit Dragon
111. Rathi Dragon
112. Rimescale Dragon
113. Rith, the Awakener
114. Prossh, Skyraider of Kher
115. Rorix Bladewing
116. Runehorn Hellkite
117. Ruthless Deathfang
118. Ryusei, the Falling Star
119. Savage Ventmaw
120. Scion of the Ur-Dragon
121. Scion of Ugin
122. Scourge of Kher Ridges
123. Scourge of Nel Toth
124. Scourge of the Throne
125. Scourge of Valkas
126. Shieldhide Dragon
127. Shivan Dragon
128. Shivan Hellkite
129. Shockmaw Dragon
130. Siege Dragon
131. Silumgar, the Drifting Death
132. Skithiryx, the Blight Dragon
133. Skyline Despot
134. Skyship Stalker
135. Slumbering Dragon
136. Spawn of Thraxes
137. Spellbound Dragon
138. Steel Hellkite
139. Stormbreath Dragon
140. Stormwing Dragon
141. Sunscorch Regent
142. Swift Warkite
143. Tarox Bladewing
144. Teeka's Dragon
145. Tek
146. Teneb, the Harvester
147. Thunder Dragon
148. Thunderbreak Regent
149. Thundermaw Hellkite
150. Treva, the Renewer
151. Two-Headed Dragon
152. Tyrant of Valakut
153. Tyrant's Familiar
154. Utvara Hellkite
155. Vaevictis Asmadi
156. Vampiric Dragon
157. Viashivan Dragon
158. Volcanic Dragon
159. Voracious Dragon
160. Vorosh, the Hunter
161. Wardscale Dragon
162. Warmonger Hellkite
163. Worldgorger Dragon
164. Yosei, the Morning Star
165. Zodiac Dragon
Statistics

 

 


 

7 Comments

Dragon Mage is usually my by RexDart at Fri, 10/25/2013 - 17:37
RexDart's picture

Dragon Mage is usually my number one target in Zirilan EDH. I fetch him first 90% of the time, because mono-red desperately needs a way to refill its hand about that point in the game, and you're disrupting whatever the blue player was plotting.

"what the hell you were by AJ_Impy at Fri, 10/25/2013 - 18:29
AJ_Impy's picture
5

"what the hell you were thinking when you put Scion of the Ur-Dragon in a deck without Dragons."

I was thinking, 'Oh hey, it also has the Avatar type, making it the perfect 4th 5-colour avatar for my landless hardcast progenitus deck'. :D

[Writes down "Fix the missing by Kumagoro42 at Fri, 10/25/2013 - 18:39
Kumagoro42's picture

[Writes down "Fix the missing Avatar type from Scion of the Ur-Dragon in the next revision"]

Good stuff, you took a lot of by Leviathan at Fri, 10/25/2013 - 23:08
Leviathan's picture
5

Good stuff, you took a lot of info and made it useful. Any quibbles I have would be minor, except for your evaluation of Vaevictus Asmadi. I think he's better than you give him credit for, particularly because he's in Green and Black, both of which give him access to tons of mana to abuse his multiple firebreathing abilities. Even still, he has an unwieldy upkeep, so I can't complain too much. Very nice overview!

Eh, the problem is that none by Kumagoro42 at Sat, 10/26/2013 - 01:16
Kumagoro42's picture

Thanks!

Eh, the problem with the Elders is that none of those upkeeps is justified. It wasn't back then, it's even less (way less) today. And it keeps from reanimating them (keep in mind I'm not talking only about Commander. If they're bad in Commander, except for Bolas, they're light years away from even the least playability in any other format.)

I also need to poing out that by RexDart at Sat, 10/26/2013 - 01:29
RexDart's picture

I also need to poing out that Fire Dragon works kind any ETB ability. There is errata. Check Gatherer. Again, another one I use in Zirilan, so I noticed,

Eternal Dragon is one of my by ricklongo at Tue, 10/29/2013 - 12:21
ricklongo's picture

Eternal Dragon is one of my favorite cards of all time! It brings me back to my very first trip to Nationals, where everyone was playing affinity and I was having sucess with a white-green control deck running 4 Oxidize, 4 Molder Slug, and 4 Akroma's Vengeance in the maindeck. Ah, those were the days. :)