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By: one million words, Pete Jahn
Apr 13 2018 12:00pm
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State of the Program for April 13th 2018
 
In the News
Yan Runs the GP: For the first time ever, a player has gone undefeated and untied in a GP.   Gan Yan went 18-0 to win GP Seattle - Standard. Wizards has hosted more than 300 GPs over the decades, and this is the first time a player has ever finished with no losses and no draws. That’s quite an achievement.   
 
Dominaria Arrives April 20th on MTGO: Dominaria will be available for sealed play beginning April 20th. Drafts will begin the following Monday. Dominaria set will be legal for play in Standard on the 18th. Lee also announced that the Friendly Draft League will change to pack per win. The Card Image Gallery is here.
 
Lee Sharpe’s MTGO Article: Lee wrote about some upcoming changes and upgrades to MTGO events here. Dominaria sealed leagues will begin next Friday. Brawl will be available in multiplayer or 1v1, with a league for 1v1 play. Brawl will be single game matches.
 
Leagues Ending SoonDominaria will release on MTGO later this month. That means that leagues – both limited and constructed – will be ending at then. Specifically, all Constructed Leagues end April 18th, and all Limited Leagues end April 23rd.   Play your matches out before then.
 
The Timeline
This is a list of things we have been promised, or we just want to see coming back.   Another good source for dates and times is the calendar and the weekly blog, while the best source for known bugs is the bug blog which appears sporadically on MTGO.com. Not listed, but important: Wizards offers either one or two online PTQs each weekend, with qualifiers running the three days prior to the PTQ.
 

Upcoming Events
Dates
Scheduled Downtimes
April 18th (extended), May 9th
Constructed Leagues End
April 18, 2018
Sealed Leagues End
April 23, 2018
Dominaria
April 23, 2018
Core Set Magic  2019
July 13, 2018
Next B&R Announcement
April 16, 2018
SOI and EMN Redemption Ends
April 28, 2018
Ixalan Redemption Ends
May 23, 2018
Rivals of Ixalan Redemption Ends
May 23, 2018

 
WotC Covered Events
Wizards will be streaming a number of events next year, including all four Pro Tours, the Magic Championship and World Magic Cup, along with 35 Grand Prix. Since Wizards does not schedule premier events on prerelease weekends and certain holidays, that means they will be streaming an event nearly every weekend. Here’s the schedule we have so far.
·       April 14–15: Grand Prix Memphis
·       April 28–29: Grand Prix Bologna
·       May 5–6: Grand Prix Dallas
·       May 11–13: Grand Prix Birmingham (double-GP weekend)
·       May 26–27: Grand Prix Washington, DC
·       June 1–3: Pro Tour Dominaria in Richmond, Virginia
·       June 9–10: Grand Prix Copenhagen
·       June 15–17: Grand Prix Las Vegas (double-GP weekend)
·       June 23–24: Grand Prix Pittsburgh
·       July 7–8: Grand Prix São Paulo
·       July 21–22: Grand Prix Sacramento
·       July 28–29: Grand Prix Minneapolis
·       Aug. 3–5: Pro Tour 25th Anniversary in Minneapolis, Minnesota
·       Aug. 11–12: Grand Prix Brussels
·       Aug. 18–19: Grand Prix Los Angeles
·       Aug. 25–26: Grand Prix Prague
·       Aug. 31–Sept. 2: Grand Prix Richmond (double-GP weekend)
·       Sept. 8–9: Grand Prix Detroit
·       Sept. 15–16: Grand Prix Stockholm
·       Weekend of Sept. 23–24: 2018 Magic World Championship and Team Series Championship in Las Vegas, Nevada (exact event dates TBD)
·       Oct. 6–7: Grand Prix Montreal
·       Oct. 13–14: Grand Prix Denver
·       Oct. 27–28: Grand Prix Lille
·       Nov. 3–4: Grand Prix Atlanta
·       Nov. 9–11: Pro Tour "Spaghetti" in Atlanta
·       Nov. 17–18: Grand Prix Milwaukee
·       Dec. 8–9: Grand Prix Liverpool
·       Dec. 14–16: World Magic Cup in Barcelona, Spain
 
2018 Magic Online Championship Series and other events
Complete details, including schedule, rules, and which online events qualify you for which online or paper events is here.   In addition, Wizards will be offering these special formats:
·       April 4–20: Modern Cube
·       April 23rd forward: Dominaria
·       May 16-23: Triple Lorwyn
·       May 23-30: TBA
·       May 30-June 6: CHK / CHK / BOK
·       June 6-13: Battle of the Planes
·       June 13-July 6: Vintage Cube
 
Magic Online Format Challenges
These are high stakes events that happen every weekend.   They cost 25 Tix / 250 play points, and last a number of rounds based on participation (assume 5-8), plus a single elimination Top 8. Details, including prize payouts, are here. Start times are:
 

Event Type
Start Time
Saturday, 8:00 am PT
Saturday, 10:00 am PT
Saturday, 12:00 pm PT
Sunday, 8:00 am PT
Sunday, 10:00 am PT

 
Opinion Section:  Master Set Economics 
For the second straight time, the market price for boxes of a Masters set are selling at significantly below MSRP. Paper prices for Master 25 packs are $9.95¸ but you can buy a box (contents 24 packs) online for $150 from a number of vendors. That’s 60% of MSRP. That’s a serious problem. Masters sets ae supposed to be premium product, but they are now selling so badly that stores will be losing money on the product. Players aren’t buying. Personally, I decided not to buy any, and did not attend the drafts at my local store. I also did zero online Masters 25 drafts. It just wasn’t worth the money.  Phantom drafts were a different story, but you-keep-the-cards just wasn’t worth it. 
 
The problem is that Wizards is trying to justify a premium price tag - $9.99 per pack – by including just enough chase cards to bring the packs to break even. The problem is that Wizards does not seem to be able to identify chase cards. The result is that the expected value of the cards in the pack is way below the price of the pack. This can work with a main set, because that is what everyone is drafting, but not with a premium product. Here’s the estimated value of the cards in a pack, both online and from major vendors. I used prices from MTGOTraders.com  for MTGO, and  TCGPlayer.com for paper.   Not that these are retail prices – if you were selling what you opened, you would get significantly less than these amounts. 
 

Average Values
MTGO
Med
Low
Common
$0.06
$0.19
$0.04
Uncommon
$0.20
$0.47
$0.17
Rare
$1.32
$3.90
$2.71
Mythic
$8.95
$20.70
$17.48
Foil
$0.91
$3.46
$2.55
Pack value
$4.39
$12.74
$7.98

 
Part of the problem is that some of the cards that Wizards picked to include are garbage filler. Tree of Redemption is the poster child for this, but over half the Mythics in this set are selling for less than $0.30 online and less than $2.50 in paper.   And these cards were not that expensive in the past. A year ago, these cards were selling for $5.00 or less. The rares are even worse. It is a problem when over half the Mythics in a set are worth less than half the price of a booster pack. The set doesn’t sell. Here’s a table with the prices for pretty much every card in Masters 25 that has any significant value. It includes every card worth more than $5.00 either online or in paper – and this is from a set with 250 cards.
 

Chase Card
Rarity
MTGO Price
Paper Medium
Paper Low
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
Mythic Rare
$55.30
$99.99
$89.84
Chalice of the Void
Mythic Rare
$28.18
$58.30
$51.77
Imperial Recruiter
Mythic Rare
$2.34
$45.08
$35.00
Ensnaring Bridge
Mythic Rare
$26.00
$35.19
$31.67
Rishadan Port
Rare
$8.75
$30.76
$23.93
Vendilion Clique
Mythic Rare
$13.97
$21.00
$17.75
Blood Moon
Rare
$20.19
$19.97
$16.69
Phyrexian Obliterator
Mythic Rare
$6.81
$17.17
$14.22
Azusa, Lost but Seeking
Rare
$2.48
$16.84
$14.90
Animar, Soul of Elements
Mythic Rare
$0.18
$14.00
$11.62
Pact of Negation
Rare
$2.16
$12.50
$9.00
Thalia, Guardian of Thraben
Rare
$0.83
$10.97
$8.98
Twilight Mire
Rare
$0.78
$10.96
$7.99
Fetid Heath
Rare
$0.80
$10.72
$7.48
Eidolon of the Great Revel
Rare
$15.07
$5.00
$3.25
Rest in Peace
Rare
$5.52
$3.82
$2.76
Ash Barrens
Uncommon
$5.37
$2.39
$1.10

 
The Professor over on Tolarian Academy played “the Booster Box Game” with Masters 25, and lost abysmally on the day after release, despite opening some nice foils. He then opened a second box – but I won’t spoil the result of that box. (View the video here.)   He played it again later, and lost again. (Watch that one here.)  Even using the discounted price of a booster box, he didn’t break even – despite opening a Chalice of the Void. 
 
The other option, for selling a set, is to include a number of really expensive chase cards. Players may know that most of what they open is valueless trash, but the chase cards could give them a decent chance of breaking even. This seems to be Wizards expectation. The problem is that Wizards seems to have a problem identifying actual chase cards from cards that are just scarce. For example, Wizards seems to think that Imperial Recruiter would be a high price chase card – and the price tag of $200 for paper copies before Masters 25 might make you think it is.  It wasn’t – its paper price is falling like a stone.
 
Some economics 101: the price of an object is a function of the supply and demand.  The supply is the number of cards in circulation, which is a function of how many times it was printed, and how large the print runs were of each printing. The demand is a function of how often, and in what formats, the card is played. Cards can also get a serious boost if they are fun or exciting in ways that draw a lot of casual players. Cards like Doubling Season and Cabal Coffers are good examples of cards that appeal to casual players and have value, despite almost never appearing in sanctioned events. That’s the theory – let’s look at some examples from Masters 25.
 
Jace, the Mind Sculptor was running at around $50 in paper and $6.75 online late last year.   It was a solid card, but at that time, it was banned in Modern. It was widely played in casual events, and saw considerable play in both Legacy and Vintage. However, that was not enough demand to spike the price – until it was unbanned in Modern. At that time, the price shot back up to where it had been before being banned.   Now, despite being reprinted in four paper and five online sets, it is the most expensive card in Masters 25, both online and off.  Demand is sufficient to keep its price high.
 
Tarmogoyf is another example of a card that has enough demand to maintain a high price, despite repeated reprintings. It has appeared in four sets now, and kept it value. At least, until Fatal Push was printed. Fatal Push was enough to get a lot of players to stop playing Goyf in Modern and even Legacy, and the price fell significantly. More recently, however, players have moved towards Lightning Bolt as general removal, and Bloodbraid Elf has been unbanned. Goyf is coming back in all Eternal formats, and its price is rising again.
 
For that matter, Lighting Bolt is still $2.00 in paper, despite being common and being reprinted over a dozen times, including in a number of core sets. The demand for Lightning Bolt is pretty much insatiable.
 
On the other end of the spectrum and cards like Pernicious Deed, Vindicate, Rishadan Port and Imperial Recruiter. Online, the first three have all sold for over $100 per copy, with Rishadan Port highest at $250 each - $1,000 per playset. In paper, Imperial Recruiter was worth hundreds of dollars per copy. Some of this was due to demand – but mush more of the value was due to extremely limited supply. Deed and Vindicate both came from Invasion block. When Magic Online was first launched, Odyssey was the new set, and nearly everyone was drafting Odyssey. Only a few players opened Invasion block cards, so the supply of those cards was never high.   It was barely enough for Standard, back when Invasion block was Standard legal.   Once MTGO grew, the supply of Invasion block cards was super small, and both Deed and Vindicate saw play in Extended decks of the period.   Later, however, the extended format died and Invasion cards became available in Flashback drafts and sealed events.   With Vindicate and Deed seeing almost no play in Legacy and Vintage, and the demand massively increased, the price of these cards has fallen to under a buck. 
 
Rishadan Port is in a similar position.  It was only available in Mercadian Masques, which Joshua and I and maybe eight other players ever drafted. It is played in Legacy decks, including Tier One decks, so it was super expensive.   However, most players who wanted to play Lands or Death and Taxes have their Ports; there are not that many people waiting to play those decks. The demand was not deep enough to sustain the price, once the supply was no longer so massively constrained. In paper, Port was $100 a year ago – it is $25 now. Online, it is under $10.
 
On the paper side, Imperial Recruiter was in much the same position.   It was first printed in Portal: Three Kingdoms. Portal 3k was a Chinese-themed set, and most of the cards were released in China.  The English printing was tiny, and even including the Chinese cards, the entire print run was small. Imperial Recruiter was later released as a Judge Foil, but that only added a couple thousand cards to the available supply. Since the card was played in Painter's Servant decks, the demand significantly outstepped supply. The card was worth a minor fortune. However, it now faces a double-whammy: it is being reprinted in significant volume, and Painter's Servant is just not that good a Legacy deck anymore. The demand just isn’t there, so the price is tanking.
 
The same sort of thing happened with Mana Drain in a previous Masters set. Mana Drain was an iconic card that was first printed in a very small set a long, long time ago, and it was super expensive. It was iconic, and Wizards thought it could be a pillar of value for the set. However, it was not 1997, and Vintage was no longer dominated by “The Deck.” Mana Drain was seeing almost no play in Vintage, and even when it was played, it was most often as a singleton. Like these other cards, it’s price tanked when reprinted. 
 
Wizards seems to build the set with one eye towards draft, which is of course critical.  The other eye is on value, but Wizards seems to define that value only by looking at the price of cards when they design the set. They do not consider how much of that price is due to actual demand, and what is due to incredibly constrained demand. It is obvious that Wizards needs to hold some cards back for future Masters sets, but it is holding back way too much. Stores that bought both of the last two Masters sets have been badly burned. If I were a local store, I would be very hesitant to buy into the next Masters set, unless Wizards can make it really clear that things have changed.
 
I think one of the problems may be that the Wizards folks are relying on nostalgia from when they were playing.   For example, Aaron Forsythe played Rishadan Port in his Angry Hermit deck, which took him to the finals of US Nationals. (Angry Hermit is a great deck, BTW.) Many other R&D people have similar memories of these old cards. However, Angry Hermit dates back to 2000.  The heyday of Mana Drain was also something from last century.  Pernicious Deed and Vindicate were also great cards 15 years ago – and have not seen any significant tournament play for at least five years. 
 
Wizards needs to do something to fix Masters sets. It cannot continue to expect stores to buy the set if it will be selling for barely over half of its MSRP a month after release. Wizards either needs to cut the MSRP (go to $6.99 per pack, like the first Masters set) or include better cards. Or both. But the current model is not sustainable. 
 
Wizards has plenty of data. All they need to do is look at the price of the cards they are planning to reprint, but to then check those cards against tournament results. If a card is super expensive, but almost never appearing in the 5-0 decks in online Leagues or the Top 32 at GPs, then maybe Wizards should not expect the price to hold up.  Or maybe Wizards needs to include a lot more cards that are in really short supply, but have limited demand. If the set had five to ten cards like Imperial Recruiter and Port, instead of just two, it might have succeeded. 
 
Finally, Wizards, please stop including cards like Triskaidekaphobia and Tree of Redemption. They are not really playable in draft, and are not exciting to open for constructed. Personally, seeing those cards featured in previews was enough for me to decide not to buy or draft the product. Mildly cute is not the same as good, and it is never a reason for me to value a reprint.   
 
I hope Wizards can get this right next time. The first Modern Masters was a ton of fun, and I spent a lot of money on the set. I would be happy to do so again, if and when Wizards can get the value more in line with the price.
 
Cutting Edge Tech
Standard: Last weekend we had a double GP in Seattle. The GP had a Legacy event on Friday and Saturday, and a Standard GP on Saturday and Sunday. The Standard event (coverage here) ended with Mono-Red Aggro on top. The breakout deck had to be UR God-Pharaoh’s Gift, which put three copies in the Top 8. 


Modern
: SCG ran a large Modern Open. The Top 34 decklists are here. I like the winning deck. It is the deck I am most likely to build and take into a League this week, but maybe I’ll wait until after the leagues reset next downtime.
 


Pauper
: This week’s Pauper deck is Midnight Gond.  It finished second in the Pauper Challenge. More importantly, it was one of the very few non-blue decks. 

Vintage: This week the Vintage Challenge was won by a Shops deck, similar to the one I featured a couple weeks ago. Shops also had a couple more appearances in the Top 8. The rest of the Top8 was Planeswalker Control and Paradoxical Outcome – both decks I have featured recently. Ninth place, though, was different.

 
Card Prices
Note: all my prices come from the fine folks at MTGOTraders.com. These are retail prices, and generally the price of the lowest priced, actively traded version. (Prices for some rare promo versions are not updated when not in stock, so I skip those.)   You can get these cards at MTGOTraders.com web store, or from their bots: MTGOTradersBot(#) (they have bots 1-10), CardCaddy and CardWareHouse, or sell cards to MTGOTradersBuyBot(#) (they have buybots 1-4). I have bought cards from MTGOTraders for over a decade now, and have never been overcharged or disappointed.
 
Standard Staples: Standard prices are down, overall, again this week. I cut a few more cards. Prices should keep dropping as we get closer to Dominaria. Some cards will then climb, once people start talking about new, Dominaria-fueled archetypes.
 

Standard Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
(Aethershere Harvester)
$4.52
$6.00
($1.48)
-25%
$19.30
$20.13
($0.83)
-4%
$19.76
$20.46
($0.70)
-3%
$5.57
$6.16
($0.59)
-10%
$10.30
$11.09
($0.79)
-7%
$24.49
$24.69
($0.20)
-1%
$6.01
$4.72
$1.29
27%
$25.85
$27.41
($1.56)
-6%
$10.21
$12.38
($2.17)
-18%
$4.32
$5.59
($1.27)
-23%
$22.19
$20.66
$1.53
7%

Modern staples:  Modern prices climbed again this week. Masters 25 is no longer adding new cards to the pool, so we should see the values returning to normal. Horizon Canopy needs a reprint. Since that was a Future Sight card, I wonder if we might see a cycle of those cards in the fall set. That would be nice.
 

Modern Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
$20.19
$20.67
($0.48)
-2%
$37.36
$37.10
$0.26
1%
$23.79
$25.02
($1.23)
-5%
$27.55
$25.34
$2.21
9%
$31.62
$29.36
$2.26
8%
$15.05
$14.78
$0.27
2%
$56.70
$46.84
$9.86
21%
$24.95
$23.00
$1.95
8%
$16.87
$17.41
($0.54)
-3%
$21.41
$20.30
$1.11
5%
$65.91
$57.84
$8.07
14%
$37.77
$41.93
($4.16)
-10%
$24.37
$23.62
$0.75
3%
$55.30
$56.39
($1.09)
-2%
$56.25
$60.07
($3.82)
-6%
$38.23
$33.56
$4.67
14%
$61.19
$59.50
$1.69
3%
$35.36
$34.26
$1.10
3%
$26.58
$26.88
($0.30)
-1%
$15.07
$14.15
$0.92
7%
$14.14
$15.40
($1.26)
-8%
$36.76
$34.13
$2.63
8%
$32.61
$37.43
($4.82)
-13%

Legacy and Vintage: Legacy and Vintage are generally pretty quiet this week. Rishadan Port is off the table. It was once $1,000+ per playset, now that playset is under $30.
 

Legacy / Vintage Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
$28.09
$27.88
$0.21
1%
$25.79
$25.16
$0.63
3%
$20.02
$23.42
($3.40)
-15%
$28.12
$29.87
($1.75)
-6%
$18.15
$17.71
$0.44
2%
$33.25
$33.48
($0.23)
-1%
$34.42
$33.72
$0.70
2%
$20.64
$19.10
$1.54
8%
$40.52
$40.52
$0.00
0%
$29.73
$27.78
$1.95
7%
$24.35
$25.90
($1.55)
-6%
$81.38
$81.57
($0.19)
0%
$16.40
$16.08
$0.32
2%
$13.77
$14.52
($0.75)
-5%
$34.16
$35.07
($0.91)
-3%

Standard Legal Sets: This table tracks the cost of a single copy of every card in each Standard legal set, plus Treasure Chests and the current booster pack. I’ll keep tracking these because they are interesting (at least to me).   
 

Complete Set
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
Aether Revolt
$81.29
$83.55
($2.26)
-3%
Amonkhet
$72.19
$71.86
$0.33
0%
Ixalan
$78.24
$81.79
($3.55)
-4%
Hour of Devastation
$58.74
$61.31
($2.57)
-4%
Kaladesh
$82.05
$85.15
($3.10)
-4%
Rivals of Ixalan
$77.36
$77.39
($0.03)
0%
Treasure Chest
$2.53
$2.38
$0.15
6%
Ixalan Booster
$3.77
$3.91
($0.14)
-4%
Rivals of Ixalan Booster
$2.10
$2.39
($0.29)
-12%

 
The Good Stuff
The following is a list of all the non-promo, non-foil cards on MTGO that retail for more than $25 per card. These are the big ticket items in the world of MTGO.  True-Name Nemesis and good art Lotus still rule the roost, with Horizon Canopy following along behind.
 

Name
Set
Rarity
 Price
True-Name Nemesis
 PZ1
Mythic Rare
 $ 82.88
True-Name Nemesis
 C13
Rare
 $ 81.38
Black Lotus
 1E
Rare
 $ 80.13
Horizon Canopy
 FUT
Rare
 $ 68.01
Horizon Canopy
 IMA
Rare
 $ 66.08
Horizon Canopy
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $ 65.91
Mox Opal
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 62.71
Mox Opal
 SOM
Mythic Rare
 $ 61.96
Mox Opal
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $ 61.19
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
 WWK
Mythic Rare
 $ 60.30
Liliana of the Veil
 MM3
Mythic Rare
 $ 59.98
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
 EMA
Mythic Rare
 $ 58.45
Force of Will
 MED
Rare
 $ 58.15
Engineered Explosives
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 57.34
Engineered Explosives
 5DN
Rare
 $ 56.75
Engineered Explosives
 MMA
Rare
 $ 56.70
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
 VMA
Mythic Rare
 $ 56.46
Liliana of the Veil
 ISD
Mythic Rare
 $ 56.25
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
 A25
Mythic Rare
 $ 55.30
Mox Sapphire
 1E
Rare
 $ 46.65
Tarmogoyf
 MMA
Mythic Rare
 $ 46.06
Wasteland
 TE
Uncommon
 $ 46.06
Mox Diamond
 TPR
Mythic Rare
 $ 45.83
Karn Liberated
 NPH
Mythic Rare
 $ 41.33
Wasteland
 TPR
Rare
 $ 40.85
Misdirection
 MM
Rare
 $ 40.52
Mox Emerald
 1E
Rare
 $ 40.11
Cavern of Souls
 MM3
Mythic Rare
 $ 39.25
Force of Will
 EMA
Mythic Rare
 $ 38.45
Liliana, the Last Hope
 EMN
Mythic Rare
 $ 38.23
Dark Depths
 V16
Mythic Rare
 $ 37.98
Karn Liberated
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $ 37.77
Cavern of Souls
 AVR
Rare
 $ 37.36
Ancestral Recall
 1E
Rare
 $ 36.91
Surgical Extraction
 NPH
Rare
 $ 36.77
Surgical Extraction
 MM2
Rare
 $ 36.76
Noble Hierarch
 MM2
Rare
 $ 36.49
Wasteland
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $ 36.02
Force of Will
 VMA
Rare
 $ 35.62
Noble Hierarch
 CON
Rare
 $ 35.36
Tarmogoyf
 FUT
Rare
 $ 34.95
Unmask
 V16
Mythic Rare
 $ 34.60
Force of Will
 MS3
Special
 $ 34.42
Wasteland
 EMA
Rare
 $ 34.16
Tarmogoyf
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $ 33.83
Mox Ruby
 1E
Rare
 $ 33.42
Exploration
 UZ
Rare
 $ 33.25
Tarmogoyf
 MM3
Mythic Rare
 $ 32.61
Mox Jet
 1E
Rare
 $ 32.48
Collective Brutality
 EMN
Rare
 $ 31.62
Underground Sea
 ME2
Rare
 $ 31.48
Underground Sea
 ME4
Rare
 $ 29.98
Show and Tell
 UZ
Rare
 $ 29.73
Chalice of the Void
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 29.64
Containment Priest
 C14
Rare
 $ 29.29
Chalice of the Void
 A25
Mythic Rare
 $ 28.18
Chalice of the Void
 MMA
Rare
 $ 28.14
Dark Depths
 CSP
Rare
 $ 28.12
Black Lotus
 VMA
Bonus
 $ 28.09
Scalding Tarn
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $ 27.66
Chalice of the Void
 MRD
Rare
 $ 27.55
Scalding Tarn
 MM3
Rare
 $ 26.89
Scalding Tarn
 ZEN
Rare
 $ 26.58
Gorilla Shaman
 ALL
Common
 $ 26.47
City of Traitors
 EX
Rare
 $ 26.43
Ensnaring Bridge
 A25
Mythic Rare
 $ 26.00
Ensnaring Bridge
 ST
Rare
 $ 25.97
The Scarab God
 HOU
Mythic Rare
 $ 25.85
Containment Priest
 PZ1
Rare
 $ 25.79
City of Traitors
 TPR
Rare
 $ 25.79
Ensnaring Bridge
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 25.60
Mox Diamond
 ST
Rare
 $ 25.45
Trinisphere
 DST
Rare
 $ 25.37
Ensnaring Bridge
 8ED
Rare
 $ 25.29

 
The big number is the retail price of a playset (4 copies) of every card available on MTGO. Assuming you bought the least expensive versions available, the cost of owning a playset of every card on MTGO is approximately $ 21,255. That’s up $150 from last week.
 
Weekly Highlights
It’s getting close to rotation time again. As always, I am trying to play through my last packs before the leagues end – but I seem to win enough to keep going. Why doesn’t this happen early in the format, when I actually need prize packs to fuel my drafting?  I am also packing up to move, so my time to write and play is even more than usually constrained.  Wish me luck. 
 
 
PRJ
 
“One Million Words” on MTGO
 
 
This series is an ongoing tribute to Erik “Hamtastic” Friborg.