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By: one million words, Pete Jahn
Jul 21 2017 2:10pm
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State of the Program for July 21st 2017
 
In the News
Changes to the Pro Tour: Elaine Chase announced a series of changes to the Pro Tour. The big news is probably that the Pro Tour in summer of next year will be team trios constructed. This should be very popular – players like team play. This also means more team GPs. The next news is that one of the Pro Tours will be Modern. The period of all Standard Pro Tours seems to be coming to an end. Details are in the article, here.
 
Changes to the Pro Player Club: Wizards is also announcing some changes to the Pro Tour Players’ Club. The biggest change is that qualification for levels will be based on a rolling combination of the last four quarters, rather than entire years. In theory, this makes a lot of sense – it lessens the pressure on the final events of the year, and should limit the number of concessions in those events. It should also make it easier to tweak the club and levels, without having a drastic, year-long impact. Players will have to crunch the numbers to see exactly how they come out under the new plan, but the theory seems sound. Details here
 
Changes to Friday Night Magic:  Wizards is also planning some changes to Friday Night Magic – the flagship paper event. They are making some changes to try to stratify play, with leagues that cater to new players, Friday Night Magic evolving to serve less competitive players, and a new weekly Standard event targeted at more competitive players.   The most notable part of the announcement was that Wizards will be replacing FNM foil cards with 2 sided foil tokens.  You can guess how that went over. The article outlining these changes is here.   Wizards response to the resulting outcry is here. My take on the changes is in the opinion section, below. 
 
Grand Prix Schedule Announced: It is not MTGO related, but Wizards has announced the GP schedule for the first half of 2018. The schedule includes a number of double GPs – a GP in one format starting Friday, and another starting Saturday. A fair number of the events will be team events, including some unified constructed events. As a judge, I really hope the use electronic decklist submissions, and verify the unification rules by computer. The schedule is here.
 
The Timeline
This is a list of things we have been promised, or we just want to see coming back.   Another good source for dates and times is the calendar and the weekly blog, while the best source for known bugs is the bug blog which appears sporadically on MTGO.com. Most of the major upcoming events we know of are listed.  Not listed, but important: Wizards offers either one or two online PTQs each weekend, with qualifiers running the three days prior to the PTQ.
 
Upcoming Events
Timing
No Downtime
July 19th
Extended Downtime
July 26th, Aug. 23rd, Sept. 20th, Oct. 25th
Sealed MOCS Monthly
July 22nd, September 15th, October 8th
Modern MOCS Monthly
August 27th
Standard MOCS Monthly
August 11th, October 21st
Current Leagues End
September 23rd 
Ixalan release
September 25, 2017
Rivals of Ixalan
January 21, 2018
Core Set Magic 2019
July 20, 2018
Commander 2017 details here.
November 2017 on MTGO
25th Anniversary Edition Masters
March 16, 2018
Next B&R Announcement
August 28, 2017
DTK, ORI, BFZ & OGW Redemption Ends
November 2, 2017
SOI and EMN Redemption Closes
April 28, 2018
 
Flashback, Throwback Standard and CUBE for 2017
Wizards will be offering either a flashback draft league, a flashback Standard gauntlet, a CUBE league or prerelease / Release events each week.   Here’s the schedule so far.
 
Flashback and Such Rotation
Begins
Ends
None announced – play some HOU
 
 
 
The new Flashback Leagues are still draft, and still you-keep-the-cards. They are 12 TIX / product plus 2 TIX / 120 Play Points. However, they are no longer single elimination. Now you play until you have three wins or two losses. Prizes are 150 play points for three wins and 70 Play points for 2 wins. The leagues run one week.
 
The Throwback Standard Gauntlet events provide a random choice of prebuilt decks from a past standard environment. These will function like the Pro Tour Gauntlets – you won’t need to own the cards. The entry fee is 10 TIX or 100 Play Points. Prizes are in Play Points: 150 for 3-0, 100 for 2-1, 40 for 1-2 and 10 play points as a bad beats award. 
 
Opinion Section:   Cutting Friday Night Magic Foils
 
Immediately after hearing the news that Wizards was replacing the FNM promo cards with double sided tokens, I had the same reaction as everyone else – I thought the decision was stupid. With more time to think this over, I have slightly more nuanced thoughts.
 
For a good idea of where I was at earlier this week, check out the Professor’s video, appropriately titled Fail Night Magic. I agreed with nearly everything he says. Or check out Wedge’s response video here.
 
Wizards explained – eventually – that they wanted to make FNM more friendly to more casual players. Wizards was looking to create a series of tiers, starting with (paper) Leagues and starter decks for new players, then FNM for those dipping their toes into tournaments . For more competitive players, Wizards is creating a “Standard Showdown” series that lead to a quarterly “Standard Store Championship.”   The Standard Showdown will feature promo cards – starting with foil lands. Beyond that, competitive players can play in PPTQs, Regionals, GPs and events organized by companies like CF, TCGPlayer and SGC. At least, that is Wizard’s plan.
 
I’m not sure they thought this out enough. They may have run out of time. The article describing the changes was released on a Sunday (!). Wizards explained that they needed to get the information out before stores started sanctioning events in the new season.   This may be true – the sanctioning window for the season did open immediately.   Stores also received an email from Wizards that said “Before you schedule or sanction anything, read this.” So Wizards employees were apparently working on these changes right up to the deadline. 
 
Now I can totally understand Wizards’ desire to create tiers of competitiveness. Magic is a tough game, and it strongly rewards play skill, experience and deck construction. It is also played to win. This means that a new player, with less skill, less experience and a poorly tuned deck is going to get beaten – a lot. That makes for a lot of feel-bads, and it also means that a lot of players do not return after going 0-4 in an event. That is a problem. If you disagree, just remember all the changes and problems in the casual rooms on MTGO.
 
I totally understand the need to create a welcoming environment, and a decent path for new players to enter the game and work their way up to / into tournament play. I’ve been saying that, about both paper Magic and MTGO, for the better part of two decades. Magic needs to welcome new players. If it does not, it cannot grow. 
 
The proposed changes, however, seem to be a stupid way of accomplishing that goal.
 
First off, giving out double sided tokens is not, on its face, a bad thing. Some players like tokens. Those that don’t can always give them to someone who does. So, if you want more new players to play events, give them tokens. But not just to the winners – give them to new players, or those that don’t do all that well. 
 
I run prereleases for Pegasus Games in Madison, WI. Pegasus has a lot of casual players, and the store has worked to get that crowd. Years ago, Pegasus had a popular Thursdays night casual group, but no tournaments at all. I started running free 2HG events, four rounds, using standard tournament rules and procedures, but no prizes. Instead, everyone still playing at the end got a random card. That got the players used to events.
 
Then, once stores like Pegasus could run Prereleases, we worked to ease players into those events. Our prize structure was much less top heavy than normal, which meant we could award prizes to more players. Anyone who did not do well enough to win at least one pack got a random foil card, anything from an old FNM or prerelease foil to a spare foil form my collection. The point was that everyone got something. That, plus a very friendly and low-key judging style, coupled with the fact that prizes for going undefeated were better at other stores, did bring in a more casual crowd.
 
I could, and probably have, written endlessly more about how to appeal to new players, but I’ll leave that for another day. I’ll just say that I think the goal is important, and I have some experience at doing that sort of thing. That said, I don’t think the way Wizards is doing this will work.
 
First off, getting rid of foil cards was a mistake. People hate to have something taken away, and they always, always react negatively. And telling players that changing from a playable foil card to a non-playable foil token is not going to convince them that the cards are not being taken away. As Wedge pointed out, Wizards makes cards. Everyone makes tokens.
 
More important, if Wizards wants to create additional tiers of play, I question the wisdom of sacrificing their flagship product, Friday Night Magic, to create a new tier. If Wizards thinks that a lot of FNM players are already the semi-casual players that they want to be playing at the event, then they should have made very minor changes – not eliminated foils. 
 
Wizards announcement does not explain if the “Standard Showdown” is going to be running opposite FNM, or if it will be held on another day. If it is going to be running on a different day, and the prize support is better than FNM, it might draw some of the competitive players away from FNM. More likely, if the events are promising, those players will play in both FNM and the Standard Showdown. If so, that does not get the competitive players out of FNM.
 
Alternatively, the Standard Showdown could run at the same time as FNM. That would have given players a choice, and by making the foils and prizes better in the Standard Showdown, Wizards might have created some stratification of players.   However, Wizards could have done that without eliminating FNM foil cards.  They could have just created different sets of promo cards. Those for the more competitive Standard Showdown would have been tournament staples, like Fatal Push and Lingering Souls. The FNM cards could have been more casual cards, like Bear Cubs and Wellwisher. That would have accomplished the stratification without upsetting people. 
 
Another problem with Wizards approach, however, is that a lot of FNM events are limited, mainly drafts. I, for one, draft almost exclusively at FNM. Standard is a very, very expensive format, and one I just have not had much desire to play in paper.  I play Standard online, but I draft at FNM.  The Standard Showdown will do nothing to get me to stop playing FNM.
       
I get what Wizards was trying to accomplish. It is a reasonable goal. However, I think they have made a number of bad decisions in how to go about that. We will see if they backtrack a bit.
 
More importantly, given how bad Wizards is at communicating anything and everything, I wonder how players will learn about these changes and new formats. Will Wizards reach out to players and invite them into the new formats? Or will players first learn about the changes when they arrive at FNM and find out that they will no longer be getting foil cards? 
 
Cutting Edge Tech
Standard: We have now had the first big event of the new Standard. The winning deck was not what I expected – it was a control deck featuring Dovin Baan. This is early times, of course – but it is still a surprise. The event, BTW, was an SCG Open – the Top 64 decklists are here.
 
Four Color  Planeswalker Control
Michael Hamilton, Winner, SCG Standard Open - 75 Cards Total
Creature
1 Torrential Gearhulk
1 Linvala, the Preserver
2 cards

Instant
2 (Abrade)
2 Censor
2 Harnessed Lightning
4 Glimmer of Genius
1 Blessed Alliance
2 Essence Scatter
2 Magma Spray
2 Negate
3 (Supreme Will)
1 Pull from Tomorrow
13 cards

Sorcery
2 Fumigate
1 Radiant Flames
3 cards

Planeswalker
2 Dovin Baan
1 Jace, Unraveler of Secrets
1 Nahiri, the Harbinger
1 (Nicol Bolas, God-Pharaoh)
4 cards

Enchantment
2 Cast Out

Land
4 Aether Hub
2 Spirebluff Canal
4 Inspiring Vantage
4 Irrigated Farmland
2 Port Town
3 Wandering Fumarole
2 Island
3 Plains
2 Mountain
1 Fetid Pools
22 cards
 


Sideboard
1 (Jace's Defeat)
1 (Chandra's Defeat)
3 Glorybringer
1 Forsake the Worldly
1 Confiscation Coup
3 Spell Queller
1 Radiant Flames
2 Gideon, Ally of Zendikar
1 Dispel
1 Essence Scatter
15 cards
 
Modern: SCG also ran a Modern event last weekend. The Top 32 decklists are here.   
 
 
1V1 Commander: The format has seen some big changes. The 1v1 and multiplayer Commander B&R lists have been split, and Wizards has taken steps to limit blue’s dominance. We have post-change decklists. Let’s see what Commanders and colors are being played.
 
Winning Commanders:
·       Breya, Etherium Shaper (WUBR)
·       Jace, Vryn's Prodigy (U)
·       The Gitrog Monster   (GB)
·       Leovold, Emissary of Trest   (URG)
·       Thrasios, Triton Hero) and Tymna the Weaver (UR and WB)
 
Legacy:  This week’s list comes from the Legacy Challenge. Not a lot of new stuff here. 
  
 
Vintage: I started looking over this list, saw Delver and Dack Fayden, and figured this for a typical Grixis Delver list, or the like. Then I saw Eidolon and Harsh Mentor and realized this was a bit different.
 
UR Mentor
DEATHTONGUE, 4-0, Vintage Daily - 75 Cards Total
Creature
4 Delver of Secrets
3 Eidolon of the Great Revel
4 Harsh Mentor
7 cards

Instant
1 (Abrade)
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Brainstorm
1 Daze
1 Dig Through Time
4 Force of Will
1 Gush
3 Lightning Bolt
4 Mental Misstep
1 Mindbreak Trap
2 Spell Pierce
19 cards
Sorcery
1 Ponder
4 Preordain
1 Time Walk
1 Treasure Cruise
7 cards

Artifact
1 Black Lotus
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Sapphire
3 cards
Planeswalker
1 Dack Fayden
1 cards

Land
2 Flooded Strand
2 Island
1 Mountain
4 Scalding Tarn
1 Strip Mine
4 Volcanic Island
4 Wasteland
18 cards
 

Sideboard
2 Flusterstorm
4 Grafdigger's Cage
4 Ingot Chewer
1 Jace, the Mind Sculptor
2 Ravenous Trap
2 Sulfur Elemental
15 cards
 
Card Prices
 
Note: all my prices come from the fine folks at MTGOTraders.com. These are retail prices, and generally the price of the lowest priced, actively traded version. (Prices for some rare promo versions are not updated when not in stock, so I skip those.)   You can get these cards at MTGOTraders.com web store, or from their bots: MTGOTradersBot(#) (they have bots 1-10), CardCaddy and CardWareHouse, or sell cards to MTGOTradersBuyBot(#) (they have buybots 1-4). I have bought cards from MTGOTraders for over a decade now, and have never been overcharged or disappointed.
 
Standard staples: Standard prices are all over the place again this week. I’ve added Hour of Devastation to the table, but there aren’t many cards worth very much, and prices for Amonkhet are really low.
 

Standard Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
$7.21
$6.83
$0.38
6%
$29.16
$23.02
$6.14
27%
$13.70
$14.18
($0.48)
-3%
$5.36
$4.97
$0.39
8%
$18.99
$14.36
$4.63
32%
$6.97
$6.97
$0.00
0%
$17.75
$14.89
$2.86
19%
$13.81
$15.28
($1.47)
-10%
(Hour of Devastation)
$7.70
$9.26
n/a
n/a
$10.53
$10.59
($0.06)
-1%
$22.84
$14.83
$8.01
54%
$33.93
$34.82
($0.89)
-3%
$10.78
$10.37
$0.41
4%
(Nicol Bolas, God-Pharaoh)
$12.55
$13.59
($1.04)
-8%
$8.34
$8.35
($0.01)
0%
$13.72
$6.14
$7.58
123%
$9.38
$9.11
$0.27
3%
(The Scarab God)
$5.97
$7.49
($1.52)
-20%
$18.56
$9.93
$8.63
87%
$25.65
$26.62
($0.97)
-4%
$6.08
$9.96
($3.88)
-39%
$12.65
$8.83
$3.82
43%
$9.36
$8.38
$0.98
12%

Modern staples:  Modern prices are moving around a bit – nothing significant. It’s Brownian motion.
 

Modern Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
$20.20
$21.85
($1.65)
-8%
$23.12
$23.24
($0.12)
-1%
$15.22
$15.70
($0.48)
-3%
$21.11
$21.19
($0.08)
0%
$40.54
$46.19
($5.65)
-12%
$20.06
$17.59
$2.47
14%
$23.68
$23.72
($0.04)
0%
$34.24
$36.66
($2.42)
-7%
$34.26
$32.95
$1.31
4%
$20.34
$19.38
$0.96
5%
$24.47
$24.27
$0.20
1%
$49.68
$49.81
($0.13)
0%
$42.69
$41.80
$0.89
2%
$73.05
$70.63
$2.42
3%
$55.13
$54.41
$0.72
1%
$13.17
$13.77
($0.60)
-4%
$22.10
$21.18
$0.92
4%
$24.04
$24.24
($0.20)
-1%
$30.72
$30.64
$0.08
0%
$25.42
$25.21
$0.21
1%
$29.35
$29.99
($0.64)
-2%

Legacy and Vintage: Prices are pretty quiet this week. 
 

Legacy / Vintage Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
$48.12
$45.72
$2.40
5%
$78.76
$73.13
$5.63
8%
$24.35
$27.97
($3.62)
-13%
$38.13
$38.56
($0.43)
-1%
$39.80
$39.80
$0.00
0%
$30.54
$30.17
$0.37
1%
$35.07
$33.44
$1.63
5%
$31.19
$32.49
($1.30)
-4%
$38.64
$39.46
($0.82)
-2%
$42.02
$42.02
$0.00
0%
$59.01
$59.53
($0.52)
-1%
$146.49
$147.58
($1.09)
-1%
$44.08
$46.00
($1.92)
-4%
$60.95
$62.47
($1.52)
-2%
$35.74
$35.36
$0.38
1%
$20.99
$21.03
($0.04)
0%
$50.87
$48.80
$2.07
4%

Standard Legal Sets: This table tracks the cost of a single copy of every card in each Standard legal set, plus Treasure Chests and the current booster packs. I’ll keep tracking these because they are interesting (at least to me).  Hour of Devastation have fallen, but that always happens a week or two into the format. Constructed players who really needed their cards immediately paid a premium. No prices are heading towards normal.
 

Complete Set
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
Aether Revolt
$69.90
$69.66
$0.24
0%
Amonkhet
$64.46
$63.12
$1.34
2%
Battle for Zendikar
$47.95
$47.51
$0.44
1%
Eldritch Moon
$116.13
$99.89
$16.24
16%
Hour of Devastation
$80.31
$100.59
($20.28)
-20%
Kaladesh
$114.65
$108.60
$6.05
6%
Oath of the Gatewatch
$108.84
$83.45
$25.39
30%
Shadows over Innistrad
$67.46
$60.07
$7.39
12%
Treasure Chest
$2.36
$2.45
($0.09)
-4%
Amonkhet Booster
$1.89
$1.51
$0.38
25%
Hour of Devastation
$4.19
$4.26
($0.07)
-2%

 
 
The Good Stuff
 
The following is a list of all the non-promo, non-foil cards on MTGO that retail for more than $25 per card. These are the big ticket items in the world of MTGO. The list shrunk again this week, just a bit. 
 

Name
Set
Rarity
 Price
Rishadan Port
 MM
Rare
 $      146.49
Exploration
 UZ
Rare
 $        78.76
Liliana of the Veil
 ISD
Mythic Rare
 $        73.61
Liliana of the Veil
 MM3
Mythic Rare
 $        73.05
True-Name Nemesis
 C13
Rare
 $        62.89
True-Name Nemesis
 PZ1
Mythic Rare
 $        60.95
Mystic Confluence
 PZ1
Rare
 $        59.01
Wasteland
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $        58.23
Mox Opal
 MS2
Bonus
 $        58.20
Wasteland
 TE
Uncommon
 $        55.96
Mox Opal
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $        55.83
Wasteland
 TPR
Rare
 $        55.57
Mox Opal
 SOM
Mythic Rare
 $        55.13
Chalice of the Void
 MS2
Bonus
 $        52.25
Horizon Canopy
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $        51.04
Wasteland
 EMA
Rare
 $        50.87
Horizon Canopy
 FUT
Rare
 $        49.68
Force of Will
 MED
Rare
 $        48.74
Black Lotus
 VMA
Bonus
 $        48.12
Force of Will
 EMA
Mythic Rare
 $        47.53
Mox Diamond
 ST
Rare
 $        45.95
Mox Diamond
 V10
Mythic Rare
 $        44.97
Chalice of the Void
 MMA
Rare
 $        44.75
Show and Tell
 UZ
Rare
 $        44.08
Mox Diamond
 TPR
Mythic Rare
 $        43.89
Karn Liberated
 NPH
Mythic Rare
 $        42.96
Karn Liberated
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $        42.69
Misdirection
 MM
Rare
 $        42.02
Chalice of the Void
 MRD
Rare
 $        40.54
Gaea's Cradle
 UZ
Rare
 $        39.80
Force of Will
 MS3
Special
 $        39.27
Leovold, Emissary of Trest
 PZ2
Mythic Rare
 $        38.64
Force of Will
 VMA
Rare
 $        38.13
Ensnaring Bridge
 MS2
Bonus
 $        38.07
Unmask
 V16
Mythic Rare
 $        37.89
Engineered Explosives
 5DN
Rare
 $        37.05
Ensnaring Bridge
 ST
Rare
 $        36.39
Engineered Explosives
 MMA
Rare
 $        35.95
Unmask
 MM
Rare
 $        35.74
Dark Depths
 CSP
Rare
 $        35.56
Infernal Tutor
 DIS
Rare
 $        35.07
Ensnaring Bridge
 8ED
Rare
 $        34.78
Ensnaring Bridge
 7E
Rare
 $        34.26
Engineered Explosives
 MS2
Bonus
 $        34.24
Liliana, the Last Hope
 EMN
Mythic Rare
 $        33.93
Underground Sea
 ME2
Rare
 $        31.47
Jace, Vryn's Prodigy
 ORI
Mythic Rare
 $        31.19
Tarmogoyf
 MMA
Mythic Rare
 $        30.88
Scalding Tarn
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $        30.78
Scapeshift
 MOR
Rare
 $        30.72
Grim Monolith
 UL
Rare
 $        30.54
Dark Depths
 V16
Mythic Rare
 $        30.29
Tarmogoyf
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $        29.96
Tarmogoyf
 FUT
Rare
 $        29.84
Tarmogoyf
 MM3
Mythic Rare
 $        29.35
Chandra, Torch of Defiance
 KLD
Mythic Rare
 $        29.16
Volcanic Island
 ME3
Rare
 $        28.87
Underground Sea
 ME4
Rare
 $        28.71
City of Traitors
 EX
Rare
 $        28.26
Containment Priest
 C14
Rare
 $        27.86
Containment Priest
 PZ1
Rare
 $        27.58
Gorilla Shaman
 ALL
Common
 $       27.30
City of Traitors
 TPR
Rare
 $        27.23
Torrential Gearhulk
 MS2
Bonus
 $        27.18
Volcanic Island
 ME4
Rare
 $        27.00
Celestial Colonnade
 WWK
Rare
 $        26.63
Tempt with Discovery
 C13
Rare
 $        26.25
Surgical Extraction
 NPH
Rare
 $        25.69
Torrential Gearhulk
 KLD
Mythic Rare
 $        25.65
Surgical Extraction
 MM2
Rare
 $        25.42
Scalding Tarn
 ZEN
Rare
 $        25.22
Grove of the Burnwillows
 FUT
Rare
 $        25.08

* A significantly cheaper promo version of Rishadan Port is available, but I do not include promos prices on the table. MTGO has over 900 promo cards on the list, and occasionally those cards are sold out for months at a time, so their prices do not reflect the market price. I tried checking numbers in stock, but 900+ is too many.   
 
The big number is the retail price of a playset (4 copies) of every card available on MTGO. Assuming you bought the least expensive versions available, the cost of owning a playset of every card on MTGO is approximately $ 23,875. That’s up about $50 from last week.
 
Weekly Highlights
Coolest video I have seen this week was probably NumottheNummy drafting for fun. Drafting for fun means second picking a Swarm Intelligence over an Ambuscade. That sort of pick means you are goofing off, which he was.  It worked out, more or less. Numot titled this video The Best Draft. Ever. He might be right.
 
I have been doing some drafting of my own. Nothing that impressive, but I have been enjoying HOU/AKH limited so much that I have a sealed league and two draft leagues running.   The sealed league is mainly still around because I keep drafting instead of playing it out. I have one serious draft league, and an entry into the single game draft league. The single game league is great not because of the single games, but because I often find just enough time to squeeze in a single game where I could never finish a full match. I used to bleed packs and tickets by playing as long as I could, then conceding. This is better.  
 
 
PRJ
 
“One Million Words” on MTGO 
 
This series is an ongoing tribute to Erik “Hamtastic” Friborg.
 
HammyBot Super Sale: HammyBot was set up to sell off Erik Friborg’s collection, with all proceeds going to his wife and son. So far, HammyBot has raised over $8,000, but there are a lot of cards left in the collection. Those cards are being sold at MTGOTrader’s Buy Price.  

3 Comments

re by Hearts at Sat, 07/22/2017 - 08:23
Hearts's picture

"Magic is a tough game..." - Pete

It was tougher before when we had interrupts, combat damage on-the-stack and damage prevention pockets. You could say there were more John Waynes in mtg before.

re by Hearts at Sat, 07/22/2017 - 15:00
Hearts's picture

One more thing;

"...a new player, with less skill, less experience and a poorly tuned deck is going to get beaten – a lot. That makes for a lot of feel-bads, and it also means that a lot of players do not return after going 0-4 in an event. That is a problem. (If you disagree, just remember all the changes and problems in the casual rooms on MTGO.)" - Pete.

This is not a problem at all, it is a natural thing, and it is good.
Or rather; there arent feel-bads, and a lot of players do not not return because of going 0-4 in an event. (As a mirror it can be said that a lot of people who do a thing for the first time do not continue with it unless certain planets align in private/social life, iows; there is a vast plethora of reasons for people to not continue with certain things/activities even if/also when they do not dislike them.)

Imagine the opposite, that you are new in a game but start winning most from the beginning. Would you believe there are much thrills to get in this game ? Do you feel the need to invest money into it to have things to exercise with ?
What do you think of the players in this game that has played for long, is it because they are mentally reduced that you as a new player win a lot against them ?

Everybody expects to loose a lot when entering a new game and its' social circle(s). Those who whine because they loose when new are likely to be narcissistic / egocentric persons. Those people exist, also in this game, but they are few and far between. The more people write about mtg-beginners like this, even if just about part of them, the more negativity will eat its' way into this game (and it has happened a lot already, on wotc' previous forum/web and etc).

Treat people as sick people and they will eventually turn sick.
Or rather; ...treat mtg as a game for sick people, then eventually that is what it is going to be.

re by Hearts at Tue, 07/25/2017 - 08:18
Hearts's picture

Oh, one more thing (Im feeling like Columbo now=)) ;

People like this sometimes talk about a divide between casual and competitive in order to give their lies "context".

That context is nonexistent, there is no divide between casual and competitive in magic other than in wotcs' description of rules enforcement levels.