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By: one million words, Pete Jahn
Mar 10 2017 2:00pm
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 State of the Program for March 10th 2017

 
In the News
Monarch Ability Coming to MTGO:  It’s played in Legacy in viable decks, so it is being added to MTGO, and cards with the ability will be appearing in Treasure Chests.
 
Modern Cube Coming to MTGO:  We will so be able to draft a Cube made up entirely of Modern legal cards.   The announcement is here.  The card list is here
 
Wrapter Wins the Magic Online Championship:  A seriously stacked field of 16 players sat down to play for the MOCA championship in Renton last weekend.  The coverage was some of the best I have seen in a while, and the finals was a really well played back and forth affair.   You can watch the Top 4 playoffs here, and it is worth watching.  The coverage archive is here.
 
The Timeline
 
This is a list of things we have been promised, or we just want to see coming back.   Another good source for dates and times is the calendar and the weekly blog, while the best source for known bugs is the bug blog which appears sporadically on MTGO.com.  Most of the major upcoming events we know of are listed.  Not listed, but important:  Wizards offers either one or two online PTQs each weekend, with qualifiers running the three days prior to the PTQ.
 
Recurring Events
Timing
Power Nine Challenge
Last Saturday of the month, 11am Pacific
Legacy Challenge
Second Saturday of the month, 11am Pacific
No Downtime
March 15th
Extended Downtime
(none announced)
Magic Online Championships
March 3-5, on Twitch.tv/Magic
Current Leagues End
May 2, 2017
Amonkhet
May 2, 2017 MTGO release
Hour of Devastation
July, 2017
Modern Masters 2017 Edition
March 23rd on MTGO
Next B&R Announcement
March 13, 2017
KTK and FRF Redemption Ends
May 31, 2017
DTK, ORI, BFZ and OGW Redemptions Closes
November 2, 2017
SOI and EMN Redemption Closes
April 28, 2018
KLD and AER Redemption Ends
June 7, 2017  (yes, 3 months from now)
 
Flashback, Throwback Standard and CUBE for 2017
Wizards will be offering either a flashback draft league, a flashback Standard gauntlet, a CUBE league or prerelease / Release events each week.   Here’s the schedule so far.
 
Flashback and Such Rotation
Begins
Ends
Cube Draft (Cube format TBD)
March 8th
March 22nd
Modern Masters 2017 Leagues
March 22nd
April 12th
 
The new Flashback Leagues are still draft, and still you-keep-the-cards.  They are 12 TIX / product plus 2 TIX / 120 Play Points.  However, they are no longer single elimination.  Now you play until you have three wins or two losses.  Prizes are 150 play points for three wins and 70 Play points for 2 wins.  The leagues run one week.
 
The Throwback Standard Gauntlet events provide a random choice of prebuilt decks from a past standard environment.  These will function like the Pro Tour Gauntlets – you won’t need to own the cards.  The entry fee is 10 TIX or 100 Play Points.  Prizes are in Play Points: 150 for 3-0, 100 for 2-1, 40 for 1-2 and 10 play points as a bad beats award. 
 
Opinion Section:  Event Coverage
I have been thinking about Magic coverages, and Magic as a spectator sport.  The coverage this week highlighted both the good and the bad. 
 
First off, you need to realize that coverage, especially of the MTGO Champs, has come a long, long way from where it once was.  How far?  I remember one MTGO Champs being played early in the morning at PT Austin.  “Coverage” consisted of a screen capture of the match, plus voice overs from the commentators.   This was back in V3, which had a spectator more.   The screen shot was from my personal account: I was logged in as a spectator, watching the match.  I was right clicking relevant cards to maximize them, but you could not see hands, etc.     
 
The coverage of this event was orders of magnitude better.  The coverage was based on the model the Vintage Super League has been using for a couple years now.  It shows the battlefield, both player’s hands, the commentators and a frame with additional information, including match data, card pop-ups, etc.  Creating this, however, is not trivial.  It requires that both competitors, as well as the commentators, have live video feeds to the people mixing the streams.   It’s not perfect, yet, but it is far better than what we had even last year.
 
The downside is that making this happen is not cheap.  It requires some skilled people working with multiple screens and powerful computers, all connected by some serious broadband .  The computers on which the competitors were also decent machines, supplied by Wizards and hard wired to the Wizards network.  Wizards was taking no chances with players losing because their Internet crashed, or having problems with the screen share software which enables hand cam, etc.  That’s why Wizards paid to fly the competitors to Renton, put them up in a hotel, etc.  That’s not cheap.  
 
Interestingly enough, Wizards did not pay to fly the commentators to Renton.  Instead, they were operating from wherever they usually stream.  Wizards could do this because all the commentators were established streamers, meaning that they had decent equipment, decent broadband, and knew enough about creating video that they could get the feeds working.  Wizards did not need to provide tech support.  Moreover, if one of the commentators did run into a technical glitch, Wizards could easily sub in one of the others.  The commentators were interchangeable, so Wizards could risk suing their equipment and networks.   The players were not, so Wizards brought them to Renton were tech support, and alternative laptops, etc., were standing by.
 
One failing I did notice during the coverage, however, was dead air.  Magic is a stop and start experience at any time, since players spend a lot of time “in the tank.”   This was one of the things I found hardest about judging – I hated waiting for the game to develop.  The commentators job is to fill in when the action is not happening.   They need to be keeping your interest when nothing is happening in the game.
 
Baseball is similar.  It involves short bursts of activity followed by lots of waiting.  I grew up listening to Bob Uecker, back in the days when coverage was not crammed full of commercials and plugs.  Back then, “Mr. Baseball” told stories, cracked jokes and generally kept things interesting.  His great skill, however, was to begin a story, then switch instantly to play-by-play, then finish the story without missing a beat.  Being able to fill time, coherently and with relevant and interesting information, is a real skill. 
 
This is where the MOCS coverage last weekend was hit or miss.  Some of the commentators were extremely good Magic players who were decent at coverage (none were bad.)  Others were good at coverage but not pro caliber players.  More importantly, how you pair commentators is really important.   Some pairings have great chemistry – Marshall Sutcliffe and LSV, for example.  Marshall provides basic play-by-play and prevents dead air.  LSV provides the deeper insight, plus snark and your daily recommended allowance (times ten) of puns and bad jokes.  The combination works.  Other combinations just don’t click as well.  For example, both David Williams and Reid Duke are very good commentators, but they both tend to pause to watch and think about the game at exactly the same time.  The result is dead air.  Still, Wizards was experimenting here, and the experiment was fairly successful.  Presumably the next round will be better.
 
Another event that got me thinking was the SCG team event that had teams of three playing real constructed formats.  Wizards has experimented with team events using “unified” Standard or Modern, in which players cannot have more than four copies of any given card across all three decks.  The result is that players are playing crippled decks, usually because they had to spread the fetchlands and good duals across three decks.   SCG, by contrast, had each player playing  decks in a different format – one Standard, one Modern and one Legacy.  I like this idea, and it proved popular enough with players that SCG has already announced another such event.   I think it also makes for interesting coverage, provided that the tournament organizer can handle the logistics.
 
Logistics, for broadcasting real world events, is no joke.  These things are not filmed with cell phone cameras.  Even SCG travels with a serious production studio set-up.   Behind the scenes at the Pro Tour is a control room that rivals that of my local public TV station.  All of that is expensive. For example, to get overhead shots of the game at the Pro Tour, Wizards has a boom jib on a wheeled cart.  I have priced comparable gear, and that boom alone, not including camera and cabling, if $5,000 to $10,000, depending on how good a deal they got.  That said, it is doable. 
 
One final note – I have heard some players, like BBD, saying that they would like to play all matches on MTGO.  He appreciated not having to shuffle, no judge calls, etc.  I agree, but it is simply not practical for larger events.  For the Magic Online Championships, Wizards flew all the competitors to Renton.  I suspect that they were playing on computers hard wired to the network – that’s how they did it at the Community Cup I played in.
 
Let’s envision a GP, capped at 900 players, at a venue.  The Swiss rounds have to be played in paper.  Even if you assume that a $500 laptop can run MTGO,  no TO could possibly invest in 900 laptops, no set them up, lock them down, support them, etc.  And players cannot bring their own laptops, either.  First of all, we have online events at which you can use your own machines – they are called the MOCS, or online PTQs.  But supposing you wanted the social aspects of lots of people playing online together, the logistics don’t work. Even if you tried having people bring their own machines, the TO would still have to provide power, and no convention center I know of would have the broadband connections or WiFi necessary to get everyone online. Seriously, I remember many events where the available broadband was barely able to support the scorekeepers.
 
Playing the Top 8 online, however, is not impossible.  It would require the TO to supply decent laptops, networking, power, etc.  It would also require sufficient broadband, but that is getting better. Convention venue broadband can often cost vendors thousands of dollars per day, but it is available.  It would also require coordination with Wizards, who would have to supply accounts to be used by competitors (at least for constructed events.)   Wizards would also have to create a special queue for the event, but that is something they already do for Streamer Showdowns, and the like.  That said, if the TO had already setup the equipment to broadcast paper play for the Swiss rounds, they might just use that for the Top 8 as well. 
 
The coverage of the Magic Online Championship shows us that Wizards is willing to experiment with coverage, so maybe they will try it sometime.   We will see.
  
Cutting Edge Tech
 
Standard:  This week’s big event was the MOCS championship, held in Renton.  The event had sixteen players playing five archetypes:  8 Mardu Vehicles, 4 four Color Copy Cat, and singleton BG Energy, BG Delirium and Temur Marvel.  In the finals, Mardu beat the cats.  
 
 
Modern:  TCGPlayer ran a series of Modern State Champs events last weekend.  You can find a ton of Top 8 lists over on their website.  I can’t resist featuring the winner of my state, because I have played this deck.          
 
Esper Mill
Matthew Haas, Winner, TCGPlayer Wisconsin State Championship - 75 Cards Total
Creature
4 Hedron Crab
4 cards

Instant
4 Archive Trap
2 Crypt Incursion
2 Fatal Push
3 Path to Exile
3 Surgical Extraction
2 Trapmaker's Snare
4 Visions of Beyond
20 cards
Sorcery
4 Glimpse the Unthinkable
3 Mind Funeral
7 cards

Artifact
3 Ensnaring Bridge
4 Mesmeric Orb
7 cards
Planeswalker
1 Ashiok, Nightmare Weaver
1 cards

Land
2 Darkslick Shores
4 Flooded Strand
2 Ghost Quarter
1 Godless Shrine
2 Hallowed Fountain
2 Island
4 Polluted Delta
1 Shelldock Isle
1 Swamp
2 Watery Grave
17 cards
 

Sideboard
2 Ashiok, Nightmare Weaver
1 Blessed Alliance
2 Crypt Incursion
4 Fragmentize
2 Leyline of Sanctity
2 Ravenous Trap
1 Stony Silence
1 Surgical Extraction
15 cards
 
Pauper:  No deck this week, but I will note that Modern Masters 2017 is adding some choice former uncommons and at least one rare to the Pauper card pool. 
 
Legacy:  No large Modern event this week, but here’s an interesting idea.   If four Blood Moons are good, eight must be better.  Plus Trinisphere, Chalice and Ensnaring Bridge.  Fun police to the max.
 
Eight Moons
Risho, 5-0, Competitive Legacy League - 75 Cards Total
Creature
4 Goblin Rabblemaster
4 Magus of the Moon
4 Simian Spirit Guide
4 Sin Prodder
16 cards

Sorcery
2 Fiery Confluence
2 Rolling Earthquake/> 4 cards
Artifact
4 Chalice of the Void
4 Chrome Mox
2 Ensnaring Bridge
3 Trinisphere
13 cards

Enchantment
4 Blood Moon
4 cards
Planeswalker
4 Chandra, Torch of Defiance
4 cards

Land
4 Ancient Tomb
4 City of Traitors
11 Mountain
19 cards
 

Sideboard
2 Ensnaring Bridge
4 Leyline of the Void
2 Pia and Kiran Nalaar
1 Ratchet Bomb
4 Sulfur Elemental
2 Umezawa's Jitte
15 cards
 
Vintage:  The Vintage Super League is happening Tuesday evenings.   
 
 
 
Card Prices
 
Note:  all my prices come from the fine folks at MTGOTraders.com.  These are retail prices, and generally the price of the lowest priced, actively traded version.  (Prices for some rare promo versions are not updated when not in stock, so I skip those.)   You can get these cards at MTGOTraders.com web store, or from their bots:  MTGOTradersBot(#) (they have bots 1-10), CardCaddy and CardWareHouse, or sell cards to MTGOTradersBuyBot(#) (they have buybots 1-4).  I have bought cards from MTGOTraders for over a decade now, and have never been overcharged or disappointed.
 
Standard staples:  Standard prices were mixed again this week.  Cards from the BG decks are dropping, while the cards that have done well recently have gone up.
 
Standard Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
Archangel Avacyn
$12.47
$10.77
$1.70
16%
Chandra, Torch of Defiance
$16.70
$14.00
$2.70
19%
Gideon, Ally of Zendikar
$29.79
$28.23
$1.56
6%
Grim Flayer
$18.61
$16.66
$1.95
12%
Heart of Kiran
$20.39
$22.49
($2.10)
-9%
Hissing Quagmire
$4.32
$9.58
($5.26)
-55%
Ishkanah, Grafwidow
$5.96
$7.65
($1.69)
-22%
Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
$19.43
$23.66
($4.23)
-18%
Kozilek's Return
$13.66
$19.26
($5.60)
-29%
Liliana, the Last Hope
$27.97
$30.77
($2.80)
-9%
Nahiri, the Harbinger
$16.26
$20.33
($4.07)
-20%
Nissa, Voice of Zendikar
$13.65
$14.22
($0.57)
-4%
Oath of Nissa
$9.33
$8.86
$0.47
5%
Ob Nixilis, Reignited
$7.61
$11.39
($3.78)
-33%
Saheeli Rai
$9.37
$9.43
($0.06)
-1%
Tamiyo, Field Researcher
$9.14
$9.21
($0.07)
-1%
Thought-Knot Seer
$8.65
$9.91
($1.26)
-13%
Tireless Tracker
$5.87
$5.78
$0.09
2%
Torrential Gearhulk
$19.44
$17.52
$1.92
11%
Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger
$12.29
$10.10
$2.19
22%
Verdurous Gearhulk
$6.48
$7.65
($1.17)
-15%
Walking Ballista
$11.16
$12.61
($1.45)
-11%
Wandering Fumarole
$7.02
$7.35
($0.33)
-4%
Modern staples:   Modern prices are generally up since two weeks ago.  A few of the cards that we now know will be in MM17 are beginning to fall, but nothing has dropped very far.  That may change, but it does make some sense. Modern Masters is an expensive set, and will not provide all that many copies of the chase cards.  After all, Goyf has been in two MM sets already, and it has not fallen all that far.  As for the cards that are not being reprinted, they all climbed. 
   
Modern Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
Ancestral Vision
$34.76
$26.94
$7.82
29%
Batterskull
$35.31
$36.41
($1.10)
-3%
Blood Moon
$22.57
$28.92
($6.35)
-22%
Cavern of Souls
$19.54
$22.92
($3.38)
-15%
Chalice of the Void
$36.17
$31.46
$4.71
15%
Eidolon of the Great Revel
$26.91
$28.89
($1.98)
-7%
Engineered Explosives
$46.11
$35.61
$10.50
29%
Ensnaring Bridge
$42.82
$32.69
$10.13
31%
Griselbrand
$20.93
$21.92
($0.99)
-5%
Grove of the Burnwillows
$24.80
$22.56
$2.24
10%
Horizon Canopy
$26.79
$25.76
$1.03
4%
Karn Liberated
$29.44
$26.95
$2.49
9%
Liliana of the Veil
$73.27
$84.01
($10.74)
-13%
Mox Opal
$41.30
$34.88
$6.42
18%
Noble Hierarch
$27.30
$18.48
$8.82
48%
Scalding Tarn
$17.81
$15.91
$1.90
12%
Scapeshift
$36.05
$28.03
$8.02
29%
Tarmogoyf
$44.37
$49.42
($5.05)
-10%
Voice of Resurgence
$15.63
$20.22
($4.59)
-23%
Legacy and Vintage:  Legacy and Vintage took a mild slide this week.  Ancestral slipped again.  Wizards needs to do something else to promote Vintage.  The Challenges are nice, but here’s hoping the Vintage leagues get here soon.    
 
Legacy / Vintage Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
Ancestral Recall
$22.63
$25.36
($2.73)
-11%
Back to Basics
$27.35
$29.49
($2.14)
-7%
Black Lotus
$84.38
$83.42
$0.96
1%
Containment Priest
$23.69
$24.20
($0.51)
-2%
Doomsday
$26.17
$25.77
$0.40
2%
Exploration
$40.89
$41.02
($0.13)
0%
Food Chain
$38.23
$40.51
($2.28)
-6%
Force of Will
$21.39
$20.76
$0.63
3%
From the Ashes
$35.31
$35.35
($0.04)
0%
Gaea's Cradle
$31.73
$34.81
($3.08)
-9%
Infernal Tutor
$36.31
$31.46
$4.85
15%
Jace, Vryn's Prodigy
$22.02
$23.10
($1.08)
-5%
Leovold, Emissary of Trest
$28.19
$29.50
($1.31)
-4%
Meren of Clan Nel Toth
$29.52
$29.35
$0.17
1%
Misdirection
$34.46
$34.14
$0.32
1%
Mox Jet
$19.46
$20.36
($0.90)
-4%
Mox Sapphire
$27.20
$29.19
($1.99)
-7%
Rishadan Port
$170.34
$170.64
($0.30)
0%
Show and Tell
$53.93
$53.53
$0.40
1%
Tangle Wire
$18.81
$20.36
($1.55)
-8%
True-Name Nemesis
$52.74
$47.28
$5.46
12%
Unmask
$32.59
$31.82
$0.77
2%
Volcanic Island
$14.89
$12.51
$2.38
19%
Wasteland
$44.12
$45.69
($1.57)
-3%
Set Redemption:  You can redeem complete sets on MTGO.  You need to purchase a redemption voucher from the store for $25.  During the next downtime, Wizards removes a complete set from your account and sends you the same set in paper.   Treasure Chests and the current booster packs are here because they don’t really fit anywhere else.
 
Complete Set
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
Aether Revolt
$74.95
$82.23
($7.28)
-9%
Battle for Zendikar
$80.95
$81.98
($1.03)
-1%
Eldritch Moon
$96.94
$99.98
($3.04)
-3%
Kaladesh
$104.30
$97.18
$7.12
7%
Oath of the Gatewatch
$103.74
$123.36
($19.62)
-16%
Shadows over Innistrad
$70.34
$69.04
$1.30
2%
Treasure Chest
$2.53
$2.55
($0.02)
-1%
Aether Revolt Booster
$3.71
$3.61
$0.10
3%
Kaladesh Booster
$1.59
$1.60
($0.01)
-1%
 
The Good Stuff
 
The following is a list of all the non-promo, non-foil cards on MTGO that retail for more than $25 per card.  These are the big ticket items in the world of MTGO.  Still a shade over sixty cards on the list.  Reprinting Liliana means Black Lotus holds second place, but Ancestral Recall has fallen off the table.  Amazing. 
 
Name
Set
Rarity
 Price
Rishadan Port
 MM
Rare
 $ 170.34
Black Lotus
 VMA
Bonus
 $ 84.38
Liliana of the Veil
 ISD
Mythic Rare
 $ 73.27
Wasteland
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $ 56.76
Show and Tell
 UZ
Rare
 $ 53.93
True-Name Nemesis
 PZ1
Mythic Rare
 $ 53.09
True-Name Nemesis
 C13
Rare
 $ 52.74
Wasteland
 TE
Uncommon
 $ 48.73
Engineered Explosives
 MMA
Rare
 $ 47.21
Engineered Explosives
 5DN
Rare
 $ 47.05
Tarmogoyf
 FUT
Rare
 $ 46.31
Engineered Explosives
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 46.11
Tarmogoyf
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $ 45.47
Wasteland
 EMA
Rare
 $ 45.02
Ensnaring Bridge
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 44.98
Tarmogoyf
 MMA
Mythic Rare
 $ 44.37
Wasteland
 TPR
Rare
 $ 44.12
Ensnaring Bridge
 7E
Rare
 $ 43.76
Ensnaring Bridge
 8ED
Rare
 $ 43.27
Mox Opal
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 42.83
Ensnaring Bridge
 ST
Rare
 $ 42.82
Mox Opal
 SOM
Mythic Rare
 $ 42.36
Mox Opal
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $ 41.30
Exploration
 UZ
Rare
 $ 40.89
Chalice of the Void
 MMA
Rare
 $ 38.98
Food Chain
 MM
Rare
 $ 38.23
Chalice of the Void
 MRD
Rare
 $ 38.10
Unmask
 MM
Rare
 $ 36.78
Infernal Tutor
 DIS
Rare
 $ 36.31
Chalice of the Void
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 36.17
Scapeshift
 MOR
Rare
 $ 36.05
Ancestral Vision
 TSP
Rare
 $ 36.03
From the Ashes
 C13
Rare
 $ 35.31
Batterskull
 NPH
Mythic Rare
 $ 35.31
Ancestral Vision
 DD2
Rare
 $ 34.76
Misdirection
 MM
Rare
 $ 34.46
Unmask
 V16
Mythic Rare
 $ 32.59
Scalding Tarn
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $ 32.31
Gaea's Cradle
 UZ
Rare
 $ 31.73
Horizon Canopy
 FUT
Rare
 $ 31.43
Mishra's Bauble
 CSP
Uncommon
 $ 30.97
Force of Will
 MED
Rare
 $ 30.53
Gideon, Ally of Zendikar
 BFZ
Mythic Rare
 $ 29.79
Karn Liberated
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $ 29.72
Meren of Clan Nel Toth
 PZ1
Rare
 $ 29.52
Karn Liberated
 NPH
Mythic Rare
 $ 29.44
Arcbound Ravager
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 28.94
Oblivion Stone
 MS2
Bonus
 $ 28.83
Noble Hierarch
 CON
Rare
 $ 28.22
Leovold, Emissary of Trest
 PZ2
Mythic Rare
 $ 28.19
Liliana, the Last Hope
 EMN
Mythic Rare
 $ 27.97
Back to Basics
 UZ
Rare
 $ 27.35
Noble Hierarch
 MM2
Rare
 $ 27.30
Containment Priest
 C14
Rare
 $ 27.23
Mox Sapphire
 VMA
Bonus
 $ 27.20
Eidolon of the Great Revel
 JOU
Rare
 $ 26.91
Horizon Canopy
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $ 26.79
Doomsday
 WL
Rare
 $ 26.17
Fulminator Mage
 SHM
Rare
 $ 25.71
Surgical Extraction
 NPH
Rare
 $ 25.51
Grove of the Burnwillows
 FUT
Rare
 $ 25.16
 
The big number is the retail price of a playset (4 copies) of every card available on MTGO. Assuming you bought the least expensive versions available, the cost of owning a playset of every card on MTGO is $ 23,285.  That is down $520 from last week.
 
Weekly Highlights
 
Most thought provoking video of the week:  Top 10 Magic Advertising Fails video.  I remember the Vizzidrix commercial.  Also, if you can stand watching really, really bad videos, search for Motel California “MTV Invitational” on YouTube.  What were they thinking?
 
 
PRJ
 
“One Million Words” and “3MWords” on MTGO
 
 
This series is an ongoing tribute to Erik “Hamtastic” Friborg.
 
HammyBot Super Sale:  HammyBot was set up to sell off Erik Friborg’s collection, with all proceeds going to his wife and son.  So far, HammyBot has raised over $8,000, but there are a lot of cards left in the collection.  Those cards are being sold at MTGOTrader’s Buy Price.   
 
 

3 Comments

Autocorrect by Sensei at Fri, 03/10/2017 - 15:33
Sensei's picture

So much

Ah but now that they are by Paul Leicht at Fri, 03/10/2017 - 16:32
Paul Leicht's picture
5

Ah but now that they are centralizing the TO responsibilities into the new ChannelFireball Events organization maybe this plan of GPs being run on mtgo can be a thing. Monopolies tend to have less problems profit wise vs overhead right?

re by Hearts at Sat, 03/11/2017 - 19:12
Hearts's picture

Less diversity = less to talk about.

So you have the commentators saying the same things (or keeping shut because there isnt anything new to say) when commentating a new match in coverage of an event. Bombshell cards (mostly mythics) only fit together with so many cards of the lower rarities and that makes for great repetition of cards/decklists among the players.

You want LSV and the likes to say "This deck seems to want to do this or that..." when seeing a decklist or seeing cards in play, you do not want LSV and other commentators to say "This deck does this." and be right every time about it.

Everything becomes static, the game and the pilot factor disappear (it becomes too easy to spot what the opposing deck will do), PTs are decided by the the random factors this game has and Judges who rule randomly because there arent clear enough rules for the game - on top of that you have some players who see this clearly and decides to cheat - or "cheat" because the game isnt clear enough on what is or isnt cheating - and the cheats are hard to spot because the judges are, ... , well, wrong, too often at least.