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By: one million words, Pete Jahn
May 12 2017 11:00am
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State of the Program for May 12th 2017
 
In the News
Challenge Events in Every Format Every Weekend: Wizards has announced that they will have Challenge tournaments every weekend. All of these will cost 25 Tix / 250 pp, and pay out in treasure chests and play points. The events will be staggered.
 
·       Modern – 8am Saturday
·       Vintage – 10am Saturday
·       1v1 Commander – noon Saturday
·       Legacy – 8am Sunday
·       Pauper – 10am Sunday
 
All times are Pacific. Prizes mean a profit for the Top 16 finishers, and those finishing 17-32 get their entry fee back.   The events begin the weekend after next. Details here.
 
Combo Winter Returns: The Throwback format this week is Standard featuring Urza’s block. It’s totally off the wall, and the reason the entire R&D staff almost got canned. A lot more details in the Opinion Section. (Spoiler – I think it’s insanely fun to play these decks. Less fun to play against.)
 
1v1 Commander Tournaments Have Begun: Wizards has been testing for the release of 1v1 Commander events. They have now announced that 1v1 Commander leagues and tournament play will begin May 10th. Wizards has also created a special banned list exclusively for online Commander (both 1v1 and multiplayer). You can read the article here.  Commander leagues cost 80 play points or 8 TIX, run five matches and pay out in play points and Treasure Chests.
 
Redemption Deadlines Approaching: If you like to redeem product, remember that the redemption window for Khans of Tarkir and Fate Reforged, as well as Kaladesh and Aether Revolt, are fast approaching. Wizards changed the redemption windows last year, so Kaladesh and Aether Revolt will disappear quickly. Older sets, including Dragons of Tarkir, Magic Origins, Battle for Zendikar and Oath of the Gatewatch are redeemable until this November.  Redemption for Shadows over Innistrad and Eldritch Moon ends in April of next year.
 
The Timeline
This is a list of things we have been promised, or we just want to see coming back.   Another good source for dates and times is the calendar and the weekly blog, while the best source for known bugs is the bug blog which appears sporadically on MTGO.com. Most of the major upcoming events we know of are listed.  Not listed, but important:  Wizards offers either one or two online PTQs each weekend, with qualifiers running the three days prior to the PTQ.
 
Upcoming Events
Timing
No Downtime
May 17th
Extended Downtime
May 24th , June 28th
Current Leagues End
July 10, 2017
Hour of Devastation release
July, 2017
Ixalan release
September 25, 2017
Commander 2017 details here.
November 2017 on MTGO
Next B&R Announcement
June 14, 2017
KLD and AER Redemption Ends
June 7, 2017 (yes, 3 weeks from now)
KTK and FRF Redemption Ends
May 31, 2017
DTK, ORI, BFZ & OGW Redemption Ends
November 2, 2017
SOI and EMN Redemption Closes
April 28, 2018
 
Flashback, Throwback Standard and CUBE for 2017
Wizards will be offering either a flashback draft league, a flashback Standard gauntlet, a CUBE league or prerelease / Release events each week.   Here’s the schedule so far.
 
Flashback and Such Rotation
Begins
Ends
Combo Winter
May 17th
May 24th
The new Flashback Leagues are still draft, and still you-keep-the-cards. They are 12 TIX / product plus 2 TIX / 120 Play Points. However, they are no longer single elimination. Now you play until you have three wins or two losses. Prizes are 150 play points for three wins and 70 Play points for 2 wins. The leagues run one week.
 
The Throwback Standard Gauntlet events provide a random choice of prebuilt decks from a past standard environment. These will function like the Pro Tour Gauntlets – you won’t need to own the cards. The entry fee is 10 TIX or 100 Play Points. Prizes are in Play Points: 150 for 3-0, 100 for 2-1, 40 for 1-2 and 10 play points as a bad beats award. 
 
Opinion Section:  Combo Winter!
Seventeen years ago. A lot happened seventeen years ago.
 
Combo winter was seventeen years ago.
 
Seventeen years ago, Wizards banned a bunch of cards in Standard.   A few months later, they made the first emergency banning – banning a card that had been legal for just under two weeks at that point. 
 
A bit over seventeen years ago, Wizards released Urza’s block. As a result of the chaos that set created, Wizards upper management called the entire R&D staff into a meeting and explained that, if they ever created anything like Urza’s block again, they were all fired. Wizards also found a very talented pro player who had help break the Urza’s block cards – an up and coming Pro Tour champion called Randy Buehler – and put him in charge of set design specifically to prevent another mistake like Urza’s block.
 
Seventeen years ago, I was playing some of these soon-to-be-banned cards, and they were broken. It was a type and level of Magic I have rarely experienced since, not even in Vintage.  Games were less like modern Magic and more like a giant Magic the Puzzling riddle.   Turns were immensely complex and took a long time – fifteen minutes for a single player’s turn was not uncommon – but you didn’t need many turns. Many decks killed – or fizzled – on turn one or two. In Standard.
 
And now Combo Winter is back. Briefly. In late spring. Sort of.
 
The current Throwback gauntlet is Standard featuring the broken stuff from Urza’s block – some of the decks from Urza’s block plus Tempest block, some Urza’s plus Mercadian Masques.   I remember many of these decks.  Some fondly. Some I featured in the PTSD series I wrote a few years back.
 
A few of the decks are almost reasonable. (Lists here.) 
 
Covetous Wildfire uses tons of artifact mana to power out dragons while controlling the board with Wildfire. It can also use Karn, Silver Golem to animate all of the artifacts and kill the opponent with Thran Dynamos and so forth. It also has Temporal Aperture as a form of card advantage. I have a favorite memory of playing against that deck with a red aggro home-brew. My opponent had control of the game, and was spinning three Apertures every turn trying to get as many permanents into play as he could. He had a bazillion permanents in play and maybe 12 cards left in his library when I finally topdecked one of my two Apocalypses.   Apocalypse – 2RRR, Sorcery, exile all permanents, discard your hand. It wiped both our boards, but he didn’t have enough stuff left in hand plus library to kill me. Next game, however, he didn’t mess around with Apertures – he just killed me quickly.   Covetous Wildfire is good.  
 
Another fair deck – fair for the time, that is – is Stompy. It is a mono-green beatdown deck, and it is fast. It also illustrates how much better creatures are nowadays – the best green creatures at that time were indeed a 2/1 for G with a big downside, and a 2/2 for G with Echo. That said, any deck that runs Gaea’s Cradle is not exactly slow. Ingrid played Stompy in PTQs, back in the day, and did well with it. Just watch out for Perish, which all the black decks have.
 
The red land destruction deck was called Ponza, back in the day. The “Ponza” was a sandwich served at a shop in Milwaukee, where a version of this deck was created, and the deck’s namesake. Ponza drops a couple fast threats, then kills all an opponent’s lands in an attempt to keep the opponent from playing anything relevant until the game is over. Ponza is strong, but it really needs to win the die roll against the combo decks. 
 
Accelerated Blue is comparable to Ponza in raw power, and another example of how bad creatures were back in the day. Back then, Morphling really was considered the best creature ever printed, and was almost unbeatable. This blue deck was quite strong, and looks to match up fairly well against the other decks in the gauntlet. Winning the die roll helps, since the main counters require two mana – and that matters.  
 
We are at the halfway point in this list, and we are getting to the semi-broken decks, like Napster and Tinker. They really are, by comparison, just semi-broken, despite the fact that they both run four copies of multiple cards so good that they are banned in Legacy and restricted in Vintage. The Tinker deck can start generating 19/19 tokens on turn two – turn one with a god draw – and Napster can do incredibly stupid things with four copies of Yawgmoth’s Will. Even so, these decks are still not in the same category as the really stupid decks. 
 
The first of the really stupid decks is Bargain, which can use Academy Rector or accelerated mana to get Yawgmoth’s Bargain into play, then draw a bazillion cards. This was a solid combo deck – and it was a combo deck that thrived after a dozen more broken cards were banned in Standard, and after Mercadian Masques had replaced Tempest block – a change that drastically slowed down Standard.   And by slowed, I mean that this deck generally kills on turn four or five. By the standards of the year before, this was glacial.
 
Another slower combo deck from the Urza’s / Masques Standard was Replenish.   Replenish starts out as a control deck, playing counterspells and card draw early – and by early, I mean turns one through three. The best of that card draw is Frantic Search and Attunement, which are used to draw cards and dump enchantments into the graveyard. Then, as early as turn four, Replenish can return a bunch of enchantments to play. These can include Parallax enchantments, which can remove all the opponent’s lands and creatures from play. They can also include Opalescence, which turns all those enchantments into creatures. I played Replenish in several big tournaments back in the day, and I remember turn 4, exile all your permanents, turn five, swing for 20 happening fairly often. And Replenish was not the worst of the combo decks out there, even in Urza / Masques Standard.
 
And that brings us to Academy. Tolarian Academy tapped for one blue mana for each artifact in play. That meant that you could do insane things with Academy. The deck, after all, plays four copies each of at least eight different cards that are or have been banned in Vintage. The deck has a fair number of turn one kills. Playing it is basically a huge Magic the Puzzling.  I made a video of Academy for one of the “PTSD” articles from five years or so ago. The article is in my archives. In one video, I got a turn two kill against an opponent playing a Sligh deck that had a turn one Strip Mine - a problem because it can kill the Academy when you try to untap it. You can watch that game here
 
Academy was a broken, broken deck. However, it is not the most broken deck in the Gauntlet. That title belongs to JarGrim – a truly insane deck that caused the first emergency banning in Magic history. One week after Memory Jar was released, Randy Buehler and Eric Lauer took Jar decks to the Top 8 of a GP. Other Jar decks won PTQs around the world. A week later, Memory Jar was banned. 
 
Here’s Memory Jar. It is busted.
 
Memory Jar
 
How good is Jar? Let’s see. I drew a sample hand off the hand generator, mulliganned, then drew: Ancient Tomb, City of Brass, 2 * Mana Vault, Megrim, Memory Jar. Let’s see if we can win turn one.
 
·       Play Ancient Tomb, Vault, Vault, tap Vaults, play Memory Jar,  (1 colorless mana floating).
·       Blow the Jar for a new hand of seven cards: Lotus Petal, Mox Diamond, Voltaic Key, Memory Jar, Dark Ritual, and two random lands.
·       Play Lotus Petal, play Mox Diamond discarding a land, play Key (zero mana floating), pop Lotus Petal for black, cast Ritual, use Key to untap Vault, (BB floating) tap Vault, (3BB floating) cast Memory Jar.
·       Spin the Jar.
·       Jar #2 gives us two Dark Rituals, Lotus Petal, Tinker, Yawgmoth's Will, and two lands. Perfect.
·       Play Lotus Petal, sacrifice it for black, play both Dark Rituals, tap Mox Diamond for blue, cast Tinker sacrificing a Mana Vault to get a Memory Jar, use the last three mana to cast Yawgmoth’s Will. 
·       Cast the two Lotus Petals from the graveyard. Pop one to get black, cast all three Dark Rituals. Crack the Memory Jar we got with Tinker (note – because of Yawg Will, this one gets exiled.) Note that we have one Lotus Petal available and seven black mana in our pool.
·       Jar # 3 gives us Mana Vault, Lotus Petal, Mox Diamond, Necropotence and lands.  That’s pretty much a bust.
·       Cast Mana Vault off a black mana, cast Mox Diamond discarding a land, cast Petal. Tap Vault, use Vault mana plus BB to cast a Jar from the graveyard. For mana, we now have 2 Petals, 1 untapped Mox Diamond and BBBB in our pool.
·       Jar # 4 gives us Megrim, two Tinkers, Swamp, Necropotence, and two Yawg. Wills.
·       Cast Mergim. 
 
Now we could cast a Tinker for another Memory Jar and spin it, or cast one out of the graveyard, or both, but we can stop here. We have won. Once we go to end step, the first Memory Jar delayed trigger resolves. We discard what is left of our hand and get back what is left of the hand that Jar removed. Our opponent also discards their hand of seven cards. (Since this is turn one, and we were on the play, they have nothing in play and no way to play their cards.)
 
Since Memory Jar says both players discard the hands they drew via Memory Jar, the opponent discards seven card. Megrim triggers seven times.  The opponent loses 14 life. Then the next Memory Jar delayed trigger resolves, and our opponent is dead. Turn one kill. 
 
Just to recap, this all happened on turn one, off a mulligan to six. With that six card hand, we played a 5 mana artifact and had one mana left over. Then we used Memory Jar to draw seven new cards and did it all again. Four times. On turn one, off a mulligan to six, we drew 28 cards and could have drawn more.  We played one land and 24 spells. We could have played more.  We only stopped because we had killed our opponent. 
 
This was a Standard deck!
 
That was fun!  I decided to play another game:
 
·       My opening hand was: City of Traitors, Underground Sea, Necropotence, Mox Diamond, Lotus Petal, Intuition, Yawgmoth’s Will.
·       I played City of Traitors, then Mox Diamond discarding Underground River, and played Lotus Petal. I tapped City and Mox to Intuition for 3 Dark Rituals (putting two in the graveyard and one in hand), cracked Petal for B, cast Ritual then cast Necropotence. I drew 10 cards off Necropotence, then discarded down to these seven cards: 2 Mana Vaults, 2 Tinkers, a land, Memory Jar, Yawgmoth’s Will. 
·       Turn two I played the two Vaults off the City of Traitors mana, then a land, then Yawg Will.  Next I cast Petal and 3 Rituals from the graveyard, then Tinkered away a tapped Vault for Jar, Tinkered the other Vault away for another Jar, and cast my third Jar from my hand. All those Rituals and Vaults meant I still had enough mana floating to cast the Megrim, once I found one, and I had three Jars to crack to find one. The first Jar had some free mana artifacts, and the second had Intuition which got me three Megrims. I had enough mana to cast a Megrim so the third Jar was gravy.
 
(edit:  rereading this, I'm not sure where I got the blue mana for the second Tinker.  My notes are not perfect.  I think I may have Tinkered away the tapped Mox Diamond, then recast it later discarding a land from the first Jar.  If the Mox Diamond and Tinker were in the graveyard before I played Yawgmoth's Will, that would work.  I think.)
 
I goldfished ten more games.  Note that I was playing to win turn one, even when waiting an extra turn would have been the right play. That is being unreasonably aggressive, but this was just goldfishing, not actual matches.  (I'll have to wait until I get home for those.)  In this format, I consider anything that did not win by turn three a loss. By then, my opponent would be doing something – even Stompy.  I should also admit that I am out of practice with the deck. Seventeen years out of practice. That said, here’s what happened in the next ten games.
·       Turn one kill: 1
·       Turn two kill:  4
·       Turn three kill: 1
·       Fizzled:  4
 
Standard was different back then.  
 
The Urza’s Block Throwback Gauntlet runs until next downtime.
 
Cutting Edge Tech
Standard: With the Pro Tour starting today, the big names are keeping their tech under wraps. One new archetype that is not secret, but is being played and posting results, is Zombies. I have seen both mono-black and BW versions. 
 
Mono-Black Zombies
Jacob Baugh, Top 8, PTQ at GP Richmond - 75 Cards Total
Creature
4 Metallic Mimic
4 Lord of the Accursed
4 Dread Wanderer
4 Cryptbreaker
4 Relentless Dead
4 Diregraf Colossus
16 cards

Instant
1 Fatal Push
3 Grasp of Darkness
4 cards

Sorcery
4 Dark Salvation
4 cards

Enchantment
4 Liliana's Mastery

Land
3 Westvale Abbey
21 Swamp
24 cards


Sideboard
1 Liliana, Death's Majesty
2 Dispossess
2 (Never)
1 Lay Bare the Heart
2 Scarab Feast
1 Fatal Push
2 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
4 Transgress the Mind
15 cards
 
Modern: I frequently complain that the mana in Modern is too good. The fetchlands and duals combine to allow anything. This week’s proof is in a deck that splashes Damnation and Cryptic Command in a Scapeshift deck – or maybe it squeezes Madcap Experiment into a Bring to Light deck. Whatever, this one will take some practice to master.
 
 
1V1 Commander: The format is happening, and we have the first 5-0 decklists here. I won’t list the decks, but here are the Commanders, in order:
·       Jace, Vryn's Prodigy
·       The Gitrog Monster
·       Leovold, Emissary of Trest
·       Breya, Etherium Shaper
·       Narset, Enlightened Master
·       Prossh, Skyraider of Kher
·       Leovold, (again)
·       Nissa, Vastwood Seer
·       Zurgo Bellstriker
·       Sidisi, Brood Tyrant
 
Legacy: BUG Delver and Leovold decks are continuing to do well, well enough to raise the question of banning Deathrite Shaman. We will see. 
 
Vintage: Amonkhet cards are sneaking into Vintage. Harsh Mentor deals damage to anyone that activates a non-mana ability of a land, artifact or creature. 
UR Mentor - no, not that Mentor
DEAHTONGUE, 4-0, Vintage Daily - 75 Cards Total
Creature
4 Delver of Secrets
2 Sulfur Elemental
4 Harsh Mentor
6 cards

Instant
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Brainstorm
1 Dig Through Time
4 Force of Will
1 Gush
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Mental Misstep
1 Mindbreak Trap
1 Pyroblast
1 Spell Pierce
1 Sudden Shock
19 cards
Sorcery
1 Ponder
4 Preordain
1 Time Walk
1 Treasure Cruise
7 cards

Artifact
1 Black Lotus
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Sapphire
3 cards
Planeswalker
1 Dack Fayden
1 cards

Land
4 Flooded Strand
2 Island
4 Scalding Tarn
1 Strip Mine
4 Volcanic Island
4 Wasteland
19 cards
 

Sideboard
1 Sulfur Elemental
1 Ceremonious Rejection
2 Flusterstorm
3 Grafdigger's Cage
4 Ingot Chewer
1 Mountain
3 Ravenous Trap
15 cards
 
Card Prices
Note: all my prices come from the fine folks at MTGOTraders.com. These are retail prices, and generally the price of the lowest priced, actively traded version. (Prices for some rare promo versions are not updated when not in stock, so I skip those.)   You can get these cards at MTGOTraders.com web store, or from their bots: MTGOTradersBot(#) (they have bots 1-10), CardCaddy and CardWareHouse, or sell cards to MTGOTradersBuyBot(#) (they have buybots 1-4). I have bought cards from MTGOTraders for over a decade now, and have never been overcharged or disappointed.
 
Standard staples: Standard prices were mixed again this week. The Pro Tour is this weekend, and that should shake up the metagame.  
 

Standard Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
$11.82
$12.96
($1.14)
-9%
$17.64
$15.22
$2.42
16%
$10.05
$10.03
$0.02
0%
$22.39
$24.63
($2.24)
-9%
$9.45
$10.77
($1.32)
-12%
$18.39
$25.01
($6.62)
-26%
$19.07
$19.25
($0.18)
-1%
$6.94
$7.03
($0.09)
-1%
$21.81
$16.70
$5.11
31%
$12.46
$13.74
($1.28)
-9%
$34.93
$40.63
($5.70)
-14%
$16.73
$15.14
$1.59
11%
Nissa, Steward of Elements
$4.75
$6.17
($1.42)
-23%
$10.56
$10.36
$0.20
2%
$13.63
$8.40
$5.23
62%
$5.60
$8.05
($2.45)
-30%
$8.39
$7.92
$0.47
6%
$22.22
$25.54
($3.32)
-13%
$24.01
$14.99
$9.02
60%
$10.45
$10.33
$0.12
1%
$8.90
$8.33
$0.57
7%

Modern staples:  Modern prices generally rebounded. Most of the cards that fell after being reprinted in MM17 have come back to close to their pre MM17 levels.  
 

Modern Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
$40.05
$39.28
$0.77
2%
$35.03
$34.89
$0.14
0%
$18.61
$16.96
$1.65
10%
$19.09
$16.68
$2.41
14%
$39.39
$40.90
($1.51)
-4%
$25.58
$28.96
($3.38)
-12%
$33.88
$37.96
($4.08)
-11%
$36.18
$39.25
($3.07)
-8%
$25.60
$24.94
$0.66
3%
$24.50
$26.12
($1.62)
-6%
$27.98
$27.77
$0.21
1%
$17.45
$16.70
$0.75
4%
$63.17
$57.91
$5.26
9%
$37.25
$34.48
$2.77
8%
$21.04
$24.25
($3.21)
-13%
$20.81
$17.81
$3.00
17%
$20.39
$23.36
($2.97)
-13%
$26.31
$25.87
$0.44
2%
$34.16
$33.83
$0.33
1%
$17.46
$20.41
($2.95)
-14%

Legacy and Vintage: Few changes this week. A few cards are basically swinging back after the last few week’s swings.  
  

Legacy / Vintage Cards
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
$24.83
$20.86
$3.97
19%
$66.82
$64.27
$2.55
4%
$25.11
$24.35
$0.76
3%
$25.24
$25.37
($0.13)
-1%
$48.90
$47.63
$1.27
3%
$47.33
$48.43
($1.10)
-2%
$34.31
$30.37
$3.94
13%
$19.46
$24.25
($4.79)
-20%
$37.49
$37.72
($0.23)
-1%
$50.41
$49.97
$0.44
1%
$21.35
$21.34
$0.01
0%
$43.27
$42.13
$1.14
3%
$32.25
$31.40
$0.85
3%
$35.21
$35.36
($0.15)
0%
$29.32
$24.79
$4.53
18%
$157.94
$160.31
($2.37)
-1%
$53.19
$53.09
$0.10
0%
$62.03
$59.74
$2.29
4%
$36.46
$37.75
($1.29)
-3%
$21.90
$18.81
$3.09
16%
$52.67
$50.70
$1.97
4%

Set Redemption: You can redeem complete sets on MTGO. You need to purchase a redemption voucher from the store for $25. During the next downtime, Wizards removes a complete set from your account and sends you the same set in paper.  Treasure Chests and the current booster packs are here because they don’t really fit anywhere else.   Remember that Kaladesh and Eldritch Moon will go off redemption soon, even before the older sets. I’m not sure if I will keep the on the list once they are off redemption. I might, just because information on how Standard-legal sets are doing is interesting. 
 

Complete Set
Price
Last Week
Change
% Change
Aether Revolt
$76.83
$73.39
$3.44
5%
Amonkhet
$86.26
$109.69
($23.43)
-21%
Battle for Zendikar
$78.57
$70.57
$8.00
11%
Eldritch Moon
$106.80
$117.65
($10.85)
-9%
Kaladesh
$108.17
$106.01
$2.16
2%
Oath of the Gatewatch
$113.18
$96.35
$16.83
17%
Shadows over Innistrad
$83.56
$76.87
$6.69
9%
Treasure Chest
$2.48
$2.58
($0.10)
-4%
Amonkhet Booster
$3.49
$3.49
$0.00
0%

 
The Good Stuff
The following is a list of all the non-promo, non-foil cards on MTGO that retail for more than $25 per card. These are the big ticket items in the world of MTGO. As always, Rishadan Port rules the roost, but Black Lotus and Liliana are fighting over second.
 

Name
Set
Rarity
 Price
Rishadan Port
 MM
Rare
 $ 157.94
Black Lotus
 VMA
Bonus
 $   66.82
Liliana of the Veil
 MM3
Mythic Rare
 $   63.45
Liliana of the Veil
 ISD
Mythic Rare
 $   63.17
True-Name Nemesis
 C13
Rare
 $   62.61
True-Name Nemesis
 PZ1
Mythic Rare
 $   62.03
Wasteland
 TE
Uncommon
 $   58.87
Wasteland
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $   53.95
Wasteland
 TPR
Rare
 $   53.77
Show and Tell
 UZ
Rare
 $   53.19
Wasteland
 EMA
Rare
 $   52.67
Infernal Tutor
 DIS
Rare
 $   50.41
Exploration
 UZ
Rare
 $   48.90
Food Chain
 MM
Rare
 $   47.33
Leovold, Emissary of Trest
 PZ2
Mythic Rare
 $   43.27
Chalice of the Void
 MS2
Bonus
 $   42.68
Force of Will
 MED
Rare
 $   41.32
Ancestral Vision
 DD2
Rare
 $   40.75
Ancestral Vision
 TSP
Rare
 $   40.05
Ensnaring Bridge
 MS2
Bonus
 $   39.80
Mox Opal
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $   39.62
Chalice of the Void
 MMA
Rare
 $   39.46
Chalice of the Void
 MRD
Rare
 $   39.39
Ensnaring Bridge
 7E
Rare
 $   39.01
Force of Will
 MS3
Special
 $   38.61
Mox Opal
 SOM
Mythic Rare
 $   38.55
Unmask
 V16
Mythic Rare
 $   37.65
Ensnaring Bridge
 8ED
Rare
 $   37.51
Gaea's Cradle
 UZ
Rare
 $   37.49
Engineered Explosives
 5DN
Rare
 $   37.40
Tarmogoyf
 FUT
Rare
 $   37.31
Mox Opal
 MS2
Bonus
 $   37.25
Engineered Explosives
 MMA
Rare
 $   37.25
Unmask
 MM
Rare
 $   36.46
Ensnaring Bridge
 ST
Rare
 $   36.18
Horizon Canopy
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $   35.40
Misdirection
 MM
Rare
 $   35.21
Batterskull
 NPH
Mythic Rare
 $   35.03
Liliana, the Last Hope
 EMN
Mythic Rare
 $   34.93
Tarmogoyf
 MMA
Mythic Rare
 $   34.92
Force of Will
 EMA
Mythic Rare
 $   34.87
Tarmogoyf
 MM3
Mythic Rare
 $   34.38
Force of Will
 VMA
Rare
 $   34.31
Tarmogoyf
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $   34.16
Engineered Explosives
 MS2
Bonus
 $   33.88
Meren of Clan Nel Toth
 PZ1
Rare
 $   32.25
Grim Monolith
 UL
Rare
 $   31.31
Scalding Tarn
 EXP
Mythic Rare
 $   30.85
Torrential Gearhulk
 MS2
Bonus
 $   29.44
Mox Sapphire
 VMA
Bonus
 $   29.32
Karn Liberated
 MM2
Mythic Rare
 $   28.87
Mishra's Bauble
 CSP
Uncommon
 $   28.32
Containment Priest
 MS3
Special
 $  28.13
Karn Liberated
 NPH
Mythic Rare
 $   27.98
City of Traitors
 EX
Rare
 $   26.83
City of Traitors
 TPR
Rare
 $   26.74
Fulminator Mage
 SHM
Rare
 $   26.58
Surgical Extraction
 MM2
Rare
 $   26.37
Fulminator Mage
 MM2
Rare
 $   26.36
Surgical Extraction
 NPH
Rare
 $   26.31
Gorilla Shaman
 ALL
Common
 $   26.21
Grove of the Burnwillows
 V12
Mythic Rare
 $   26.06
Mox Diamond
 ST
Rare
 $   25.62
Grove of the Burnwillows
 FUT
Rare
 $   25.60
Eidolon of the Great Revel
 JOU
Rare
 $   25.58
Doomsday
 WL
Rare
 $   25.24
Containment Priest
 PZ1
Rare
 $   25.15
Containment Priest
 C14
Rare
 $   25.11

 
The big number is the retail price of a playset (4 copies) of every card available on MTGO. Assuming you bought the least expensive versions available, the cost of owning a playset of every card on MTGO is approximately $ 24,945. That is up about $110 from last week.
 
Weekly Highlights
I have to admit that the most fun I had this week was goldfishing JarGrim. I was “playing” using the Wizards website draw a hand feature and a pad of paper, instead of MTGO or paper, because I was doing it over lunch. Hey, you use what you can get. I just hope I didn’t mess anything up significantly. I did track mana as carefully as I would have in an event, but a pad of paper is never perfect. Still, it was a way to play these decks during lunchtime. It’s not like I can haul out my laptop and fire up MTGO at work. Tempting though that may be…. 
 
PRJ
 
“One Million Words” on MTGO
 
 
This series is an ongoing tribute to Erik “Hamtastic” Friborg.
 
HammyBot Super Sale: HammyBot was set up to sell off Erik Friborg’s collection, with all proceeds going to his wife and son. So far, HammyBot has raised over $8,000, but there are a lot of cards left in the collection. Those cards are being sold at MTGOTrader’s Buy Price.